1A.9 problem


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Jazlyn Romero 1I
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1A.9 problem

Postby Jazlyn Romero 1I » Sun Oct 25, 2020 6:18 pm

A college student recently had a busy day. Each of the student’s activities on that day (reading, getting a dental x-ray, making popcorn in a microwave oven, and acquiring a suntan) involved radiation from a different part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Complete the following table and match each type of radiation to the appropriate event:

In the third, column, we are given 300 MHz, how would we convert this to Hz to be able to solve for wavelength? Thanks!

Melody Haratian 2J
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Re: 1A.9 problem

Postby Melody Haratian 2J » Sun Oct 25, 2020 6:23 pm

Hi! You can convert MHz to Hz by multiplying MHz by 106. So 300 MHz * 106 would be the amount of MHz in Hz.

kristinalaudis3e
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Re: 1A.9 problem

Postby kristinalaudis3e » Sun Oct 25, 2020 11:00 pm

To convert 300 MHz to Hz you would multiply it by 10^6. This is because Hz refers to the frequency, in which one cycle goes every second. MHz or Megahertz indicates millions, which is 1 x 10^6. I hope this helps!

Kaiya_PT_1H
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Re: 1A.9 problem

Postby Kaiya_PT_1H » Wed Oct 28, 2020 5:01 pm

Does anyone else get an answer of the wavelength being 1 m? In the back of the book it says the answer is 1 nm but I don't see how I'm getting it wrong somehow.

kateraelDis1L
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Re: 1A.9 problem

Postby kateraelDis1L » Wed Oct 28, 2020 5:30 pm

I'm getting that too...^^

Silvi_Lybbert_3A
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Re: 1A.9 problem

Postby Silvi_Lybbert_3A » Wed Oct 28, 2020 5:55 pm

Kaiya_PT_1H wrote:Does anyone else get an answer of the wavelength being 1 m? In the back of the book it says the answer is 1 nm but I don't see how I'm getting it wrong somehow.

I also am getting this, and I'm led to believe the book must have made a typo because they do say that the wavelength corresponds to microwaving popcorn and microwaves occur from 1 to 10^-3 m. 1 nm would be x-ray I believe, and the book does not list this activity to correspond with this answer.

jadensteplight_2F
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Re: 1A.9 problem

Postby jadensteplight_2F » Wed Oct 28, 2020 6:06 pm

Going off of that last reply, I have heard of a few typos in the book's answer key. This could be one of them.

Kaiya_PT_1H
Posts: 90
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Re: 1A.9 problem

Postby Kaiya_PT_1H » Wed Oct 28, 2020 6:57 pm

okay cool, glad it's not just me! I think based on the range for microwaves it would make sense anyway, as Silvi said.


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