Lyman VS Balmer series


Moderators: Chem_Mod, Chem_Admin

Madeline Ogden 3B
Posts: 102
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 10:03 pm
Been upvoted: 1 time

Lyman VS Balmer series

Postby Madeline Ogden 3B » Mon Oct 26, 2020 2:28 pm

Just to double check… I was told that if an electron falls from a higher energy level to n=1 then it’s in the Lyman series and if it falls to n=2 it’s in the Balmer series. I’ve also heard that this information depends on whether or not it’s on the emission or absorption spectrum. Is this correct?

Brandon Pham 1H
Posts: 81
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:59 pm
Been upvoted: 1 time

Re: Lyman VS Balmer series

Postby Brandon Pham 1H » Mon Oct 26, 2020 2:31 pm

Yes, the only difference between the two is that
- Lyman Series comes to rest at n=1 (higher frequency, lower wavelength = UV radiation)
- Balmer Series comes to rest at n=2 (lower frequency, higher wavelength = visible light)

Claire_Kim_2F
Posts: 67
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 10:02 pm

Re: Lyman VS Balmer series

Postby Claire_Kim_2F » Mon Oct 26, 2020 2:40 pm

Yes you are correct that for the Lyman series it has to drop down to the 1st level and for the Balmer it drops to the second electron level as the end result. Also if it is dropping that means energy is being emitted.

Gabriel Nitro 1E
Posts: 90
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:32 pm
Been upvoted: 1 time

Re: Lyman VS Balmer series

Postby Gabriel Nitro 1E » Mon Oct 26, 2020 3:18 pm

Hi,

Yes that is correct! Recall in the context of hydrogen (H) atoms, electrons may leave the ground state (n=1) by getting excited by an incoming photon from a source of electromagnetic radiation. Now, in our discussion of Lyman and Balmer series we are interested in which energy level the excited electron drops down to, during which electromagnetic radiation is emitted in the form of light.

If the excited electron were to drop back down to the principal energy level (n=1) then it is considered a member of a Lyman series. However, if the excited electron were to drop back down to the principal energy level (n=2) then it is considered a member of a Balmer series. Now, it is important to note here that because the energy difference is so much larger for the Lyman series than that of the Balmer series, the form of electromagnetic radiation is more likely to be that of higher energies (as UV, X-ray, gamma rays, cosmic rays) as opposed to lower energies (as radio, microwave, infrared).

Hope this helps!

Keeryth Sandhu 1H
Posts: 91
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 10:04 pm

Re: Lyman VS Balmer series

Postby Keeryth Sandhu 1H » Mon Oct 26, 2020 3:58 pm

Yes, that is correct!

BKoh_2E
Posts: 92
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:57 pm

Re: Lyman VS Balmer series

Postby BKoh_2E » Mon Oct 26, 2020 4:08 pm

Yes, you're correct. Also remember that the Lyman Series corresponds with UV light, while the Balmer Series corresponds with visible light. Sometimes questions online provide the wavelength of the incident light, so memorize the general wavelength range for UV light & visible light.


Return to “Properties of Light”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest