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Cell diagram

Posted: Sun Mar 10, 2019 7:54 pm
by Maria Solis Disc 1G
When drawing a cell diagram, why is platinum or carbon i belive included in the diagram if it is not involved in the actual reaction.

Re: Cell diagram

Posted: Sun Mar 10, 2019 7:56 pm
by Jonas Talandis
We include these typically when there is no solid involved on that side of the reaction. If there's no solid, there's usually no conductor to actually transfer these electrons so we use an inert one.

Re: Cell diagram

Posted: Sun Mar 10, 2019 8:25 pm
by Carissa Young 1K
What doesn't get put in the cell diagram? Is it just solids and H2O liquid? Does H+ get put in the cell diagram?

Re: Cell diagram

Posted: Sun Mar 10, 2019 8:27 pm
by dgerges 4H
there must be a solid in the reaction so if there isn't one we add Pt(s) in place

Re: Cell diagram

Posted: Sun Mar 10, 2019 8:31 pm
by Erin Kim 2G
If one side of the reaction (anode or cathode) does not have a solid component, than Pt (a solid) must be added in order to have a solute.

Re: Cell diagram

Posted: Sun Mar 10, 2019 8:36 pm
by Nicole Garrido 2I
To conduct electricity, move ions, the reaction needs electrodes to move them. So if there is no metal solid in the reaction there is no electrode. So platinum is used as a conductor.

Re: Cell diagram

Posted: Tue Mar 12, 2019 11:17 pm
by Kyither Min 2K
There has to be a solid in the cell to transfer the electrons. Therefore, if the reaction itself doesn't have a solid or metal we add carbon or platinum.