Why is Plt and Iron on the same side of the cell diagram??

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Uisa_Manumaleuna_3E
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Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:56 pm

Why is Plt and Iron on the same side of the cell diagram??

Postby Uisa_Manumaleuna_3E » Fri Feb 21, 2020 10:24 pm

So I ended up getting to lecture a little late today and I missed Professor Lavelle's explanation on cell diagrams. His example in class was the equation:
2 Fe (3+)(aq) + Cu(s) -> Cu(2+)(aq) + 2 Fe(2+)(aq) with an inert conductor of Platinum.

I understand that you need to write down the Anode half reaction on the left and the Cathode half reaction on the right. But why was Platinum placed on the Cathode side? And why were Fe(3+) and Fe(2+) placed side by side without the | mark?

Chris Tai 1B
Posts: 102
Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Why is Plt and Iron on the same side of the cell diagram??

Postby Chris Tai 1B » Fri Feb 21, 2020 10:36 pm

Platinum, in this instance, represents an inert conductor that is the metal electrode used to transfer electrons. Iron is merely in the aqueous solution in the second, reduction cell. The reason Fe3+(aq) and Fe2+(aq) are on the same side of the salt bridge is because Fe3+ is being reduced to Fe2+ via the electron conductor of platinum as electrons flow from the solid copper. This happens in the aqueous solution; it's not that solid iron is becoming reduced, but that platinum acts as an electron transporter for iron in its aqueous form to grab an electron and be reduced.

Amanda Lin 2I
Posts: 101
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Why is Plt and Iron on the same side of the cell diagram??

Postby Amanda Lin 2I » Fri Feb 21, 2020 10:53 pm

Fe3+ and Fe2+ are not separated by | because there is no phase change.


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