Using Pt

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Haley Dveirin 1E
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Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2019 12:17 am

Using Pt

Postby Haley Dveirin 1E » Sat Feb 22, 2020 6:48 pm

When is it necessary to use Pt(s) in the skeletal equation of a redox reaction?

Sartaj Bal 1J
Posts: 101
Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Using Pt

Postby Sartaj Bal 1J » Sat Feb 22, 2020 7:10 pm

Some half reactions have no conducting solids so it is necessary to use an inert conductor (platinum for example) as an electrode to transfer electrons. For the reaction, 2Fe3+ + Cu yields Cu2+ + 2Fe2+, platinum (s) is part of the cathode.

Nicholas_Gladkov_2J
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Re: Using Pt

Postby Nicholas_Gladkov_2J » Sat Feb 22, 2020 11:29 pm

Haley Dveirin 1E wrote:When is it necessary to use Pt(s) in the skeletal equation of a redox reaction?


In the example that Dr. Lavelle gave in class: 2Fe3+(aq) + Cu(s) -> Cu2+(aq) + 2Fe2+ although platinum is part of the redox reaction, platinum is an inert conductor that is transferring e-, as there is no conducting solid in the reaction in both reactants and products of the solution. Platinum itself is not loosing or gaining e-, so I'm guessing no.

Lizette Noriega 1H
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Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Using Pt

Postby Lizette Noriega 1H » Sun Feb 23, 2020 12:24 am

You can use Pt (s) if there is an absence of a solid in a redox reaction; because it is an inert conductor, it will allow for the transfer of electrons without interfering with the reaction itself

Charlene Datu 2E
Posts: 62
Joined: Wed Sep 11, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Using Pt

Postby Charlene Datu 2E » Sun Feb 23, 2020 12:31 am

This is a follow-up question about this concept.
Are there other inert conductors that could be used? For example, in the homework for 6L.3B, C(gr) is used as a conductor. Is this an inert conductor because it's in its most stable form?

WesleyWu_1C
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Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Using Pt

Postby WesleyWu_1C » Sun Feb 23, 2020 1:28 am

Lavelle told us in class that Pt and C(gr) are both good inert conductors, but that Pt is more commonly used.

Kayla Maldonado 1C
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Re: Using Pt

Postby Kayla Maldonado 1C » Sun Feb 23, 2020 1:46 am

Nicholas_Gladkov_2J wrote:
Haley Dveirin 1E wrote:When is it necessary to use Pt(s) in the skeletal equation of a redox reaction?


In the example that Dr. Lavelle gave in class: 2Fe3+(aq) + Cu(s) -> Cu2+(aq) + 2Fe2+ although platinum is part of the redox reaction, platinum is an inert conductor that is transferring e-, as there is no conducting solid in the reaction in both reactants and products of the solution. Platinum itself is not loosing or gaining e-, so I'm guessing no.


Why do we need Pt(s) as the conducting solid if we have Cu(s) in the reaction? Is this solid not a conductor?

Sarah Zhari 1D
Posts: 103
Joined: Sat Sep 14, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Using Pt

Postby Sarah Zhari 1D » Sun Feb 23, 2020 11:13 am

Kayla Maldonado 1A wrote:
Nicholas_Gladkov_2J wrote:
Haley Dveirin 1E wrote:When is it necessary to use Pt(s) in the skeletal equation of a redox reaction?


In the example that Dr. Lavelle gave in class: 2Fe3+(aq) + Cu(s) -> Cu2+(aq) + 2Fe2+ although platinum is part of the redox reaction, platinum is an inert conductor that is transferring e-, as there is no conducting solid in the reaction in both reactants and products of the solution. Platinum itself is not loosing or gaining e-, so I'm guessing no.


Why do we need Pt(s) as the conducting solid if we have Cu(s) in the reaction? Is this solid not a conductor?


Pt(s) is used to transfer electrons from the Fe3+ (aq) to the copper part of the reaction. The platinum electrode is needed as Fe3+ is in solution.


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