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Using Pt

Posted: Sat Feb 22, 2020 6:48 pm
by Haley Dveirin 1E
When is it necessary to use Pt(s) in the skeletal equation of a redox reaction?

Re: Using Pt

Posted: Sat Feb 22, 2020 7:10 pm
by Sartaj Bal 1J
Some half reactions have no conducting solids so it is necessary to use an inert conductor (platinum for example) as an electrode to transfer electrons. For the reaction, 2Fe3+ + Cu yields Cu2+ + 2Fe2+, platinum (s) is part of the cathode.

Re: Using Pt

Posted: Sat Feb 22, 2020 11:29 pm
by Nicholas_Gladkov_2J
Haley Dveirin 1E wrote:When is it necessary to use Pt(s) in the skeletal equation of a redox reaction?


In the example that Dr. Lavelle gave in class: 2Fe3+(aq) + Cu(s) -> Cu2+(aq) + 2Fe2+ although platinum is part of the redox reaction, platinum is an inert conductor that is transferring e-, as there is no conducting solid in the reaction in both reactants and products of the solution. Platinum itself is not loosing or gaining e-, so I'm guessing no.

Re: Using Pt

Posted: Sun Feb 23, 2020 12:24 am
by Lizette Noriega 1H
You can use Pt (s) if there is an absence of a solid in a redox reaction; because it is an inert conductor, it will allow for the transfer of electrons without interfering with the reaction itself

Re: Using Pt

Posted: Sun Feb 23, 2020 12:31 am
by Charlene Datu 2E
This is a follow-up question about this concept.
Are there other inert conductors that could be used? For example, in the homework for 6L.3B, C(gr) is used as a conductor. Is this an inert conductor because it's in its most stable form?

Re: Using Pt

Posted: Sun Feb 23, 2020 1:28 am
by WesleyWu_1C
Lavelle told us in class that Pt and C(gr) are both good inert conductors, but that Pt is more commonly used.

Re: Using Pt

Posted: Sun Feb 23, 2020 1:46 am
by Kayla Maldonado 1C
Nicholas_Gladkov_2J wrote:
Haley Dveirin 1E wrote:When is it necessary to use Pt(s) in the skeletal equation of a redox reaction?


In the example that Dr. Lavelle gave in class: 2Fe3+(aq) + Cu(s) -> Cu2+(aq) + 2Fe2+ although platinum is part of the redox reaction, platinum is an inert conductor that is transferring e-, as there is no conducting solid in the reaction in both reactants and products of the solution. Platinum itself is not loosing or gaining e-, so I'm guessing no.


Why do we need Pt(s) as the conducting solid if we have Cu(s) in the reaction? Is this solid not a conductor?

Re: Using Pt

Posted: Sun Feb 23, 2020 11:13 am
by Sarah Zhari 1D
Kayla Maldonado 1A wrote:
Nicholas_Gladkov_2J wrote:
Haley Dveirin 1E wrote:When is it necessary to use Pt(s) in the skeletal equation of a redox reaction?


In the example that Dr. Lavelle gave in class: 2Fe3+(aq) + Cu(s) -> Cu2+(aq) + 2Fe2+ although platinum is part of the redox reaction, platinum is an inert conductor that is transferring e-, as there is no conducting solid in the reaction in both reactants and products of the solution. Platinum itself is not loosing or gaining e-, so I'm guessing no.


Why do we need Pt(s) as the conducting solid if we have Cu(s) in the reaction? Is this solid not a conductor?


Pt(s) is used to transfer electrons from the Fe3+ (aq) to the copper part of the reaction. The platinum electrode is needed as Fe3+ is in solution.