Anode vs Cathode

Moderators: Chem_Mod, Chem_Admin

Ellis Song 4I
Posts: 102
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:17 am

Anode vs Cathode

Postby Ellis Song 4I » Fri Feb 28, 2020 12:34 am

When given a galvanic cell, how do you determine which is the anode and which is the cathode? Is it just based on the anode being written on the left side and cathode being written on the right?

MAC 4G
Posts: 121
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Anode vs Cathode

Postby MAC 4G » Fri Feb 28, 2020 12:54 am

Typically, yes, the anode would be written on the left of the salt bridge and the cathode would be written on the right. Assuming the question provided you with the cell diagram.

Lara Kristine Bacasen 1L
Posts: 110
Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2019 12:16 am
Been upvoted: 1 time

Re: Anode vs Cathode

Postby Lara Kristine Bacasen 1L » Fri Feb 28, 2020 1:07 am

The galvanic diagram should be always be shown with the anode on the left and cathode on the right.

andrewcj 2C
Posts: 102
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Anode vs Cathode

Postby andrewcj 2C » Fri Feb 28, 2020 1:18 am

You can also examine the reactions happening at the electrodes. The oxidation reaction happens at the anode and the reduction reaction happens at the cathode. If it is still unclear, you can also check reduction potential, in the sense that E has to be positive for the galvanic cell to work spontaneously.

Matt F
Posts: 100
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Anode vs Cathode

Postby Matt F » Fri Feb 28, 2020 10:06 am

Convention is for the anode to be written on the left side and the cathode written on the right side, hence why Enaught(cell)=E(right)-E(left). As mentioned above, you can always check to see what reaction is happening where, since oxidation occurs at the anode and reduction occurs at the cathode

Leslie Almaraz 4G
Posts: 99
Joined: Fri Aug 02, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Anode vs Cathode

Postby Leslie Almaraz 4G » Fri Feb 28, 2020 3:28 pm

how do you determine it based on the cell potentials? especially if the values are similar?

Shutong Hou_1F
Posts: 117
Joined: Sat Sep 14, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Anode vs Cathode

Postby Shutong Hou_1F » Fri Feb 28, 2020 10:26 pm

Leslie Almaraz 4G wrote:how do you determine it based on the cell potentials? especially if the values are similar?


I believe that we should then check the formula sheet or appendix, and choose the substance with more positive reduction potential as the cathode. I think there should always be a difference that is not too small.

Omar Selim 1D
Posts: 108
Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Anode vs Cathode

Postby Omar Selim 1D » Fri Feb 28, 2020 10:31 pm

Fundamentally, oxidation happens at the anode and reduction happens at the cathode. In terms of writing it out, you typically include the anode on the left and the cathode on the right.

Radha Patel 4I
Posts: 97
Joined: Tue Feb 12, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Anode vs Cathode

Postby Radha Patel 4I » Fri Feb 28, 2020 11:15 pm

If you were given an image then I heard that typically the left side is the anode (oxidation) and the right side is cathode (reduction). In a cell diagram , the oxidation is always written on the left side and the reduction is always on the right. You can also look at the half reactions to determine which one is which if you are given them.

Diana Chavez-Carrillo 2L
Posts: 122
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:18 am

Re: Anode vs Cathode

Postby Diana Chavez-Carrillo 2L » Sat Feb 29, 2020 1:05 am

One of the UAs mentioned how we should not always rely on the anode to be on the left side and the cathode on the right side because it is possible for them to be switched. It would be more important for you to look at the given reaction and determine from there whether its a reduction (anode) or oxidation (cathode) and then look at the image that contains the electrodes.

Catherine Daye 1L
Posts: 104
Joined: Wed Sep 11, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Anode vs Cathode

Postby Catherine Daye 1L » Sat Feb 29, 2020 10:04 am

Yes, the anode is written on the left side and it is the one being oxidized. An easy way to remember this is “an ox” (anode oxidized) and “red cat” (cathode reduced).

Jaci Glassick 2G
Posts: 104
Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Anode vs Cathode

Postby Jaci Glassick 2G » Sat Feb 29, 2020 10:42 am

The anode is pretty much always going to be on the left side of the salt bridge while the cathode will be on the right.

Manav Govil 1B
Posts: 104
Joined: Sat Sep 07, 2019 12:19 am

Re: Anode vs Cathode

Postby Manav Govil 1B » Sat Feb 29, 2020 11:42 am

There is no left or right in determining what an anode or cathode is. You should know that the anode is the part where things get oxidized and the cathode is the part where things get reduced. They may try to trick you on the test by switching the positions of the anode and cathode.

Bryce Barbee
Posts: 103
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:20 am

Re: Anode vs Cathode

Postby Bryce Barbee » Sat Feb 29, 2020 12:36 pm

During discussion, my TA would tell us which one was the anode and which was the cathode. I think it is based off of left and right usually though.

205405339
Posts: 77
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Anode vs Cathode

Postby 205405339 » Sat Feb 29, 2020 2:15 pm

usually anode will be to the left and the cathode will be to the right. Also oxidation occurs at the anode and reduction happens at the cathode

Rebekah Alfred 1J
Posts: 102
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:15 am
Been upvoted: 1 time

Re: Anode vs Cathode

Postby Rebekah Alfred 1J » Sat Feb 29, 2020 2:28 pm

Bryce Barbee wrote:During discussion, my TA would tell us which one was the anode and which was the cathode. I think it is based off of left and right usually though.


My TA also would tell us which one was the anode and which one was the cathode.


Return to “Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests