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6M.7

Posted: Tue Mar 03, 2020 10:19 am
by Ellis Song 4I
This question asks us to order metals by increasing strength as a reducing agent but how do we determine this? I know that the more negative the standard reduction potential, the stronger it would be as a reducing agent but when I looked up the reduction potentials in the back of the book, there were multiple reduction potentials based on how many electrons were added. How do we know which one to use?

a: Cu, Zn, Cr, Fe
b: Li, Na, K, Mg
c: U, V, Ti, Al
d: Ni, Sn, Au, Ag

Re: 6M.7

Posted: Tue Mar 03, 2020 12:49 pm
by Rita Chen 1B
I had the same question, but I think it would be given to us. Maybe use the one with the solid substance?

Re: 6M.7

Posted: Tue Mar 03, 2020 3:36 pm
by Jessica Esparza 2H
I just used the ones that all use the same amount of electrons and it seemed to work out.

Re: 6M.7

Posted: Tue Mar 03, 2020 4:50 pm
by MAC 4G
For the most part, I generally just looked at the values that corresponded the reduction equation that had 1e- being transferred.

Re: 6M.7

Posted: Tue Mar 03, 2020 6:39 pm
by Micah3J
Sorry this question is about 6M.3... Can someone briefly explain the process for 6M.3? I just want to make sure I have the right concepts down

Re: 6M.7

Posted: Thu Mar 05, 2020 2:02 am
by Charlyn Ghoubrial 2I
Micah3J wrote:Sorry this question is about 6M.3... Can someone briefly explain the process for 6M.3? I just want to make sure I have the right concepts down

Use the equation Ecell= Ec - Ea ( Ecathode - Eanode) and then figure out the standard reduction potential of each anode and cathode and then plug them in the equation