14.33


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Madeline_Foo_3J
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14.33

Postby Madeline_Foo_3J » Sat Feb 11, 2017 2:01 pm

Can someone explain part B to me? What does it mean if an element will disproportionate in aqueous solution ?

Chem_Mod
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Re: 14.33

Postby Chem_Mod » Sat Feb 11, 2017 4:24 pm

Disproportionation is a type of redox reaction in which an element undergoes both oxidation and reduction to form two different products. In other words, part of the element oxidizes(or reduces) the other part of the element. This will give out two different product of the same element. This is common in multiple valence nonmetal element like Cl, Br, P etc. For example,

andrea_Disc3D
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Re: 14.33

Postby andrea_Disc3D » Sun Feb 12, 2017 10:00 am

When the question asks to identify whether Tl^+ will disproportionate in an aqueous solution, the answer is no because Gibss free energy is positive (Given: +215kj/mol) and not spontaneous, but also K <1, right? Is this a right reasoning? I know that there is also an equation that related Gibbs Free energy and the equilibrium constant so would proving that K<1, also be a sufficient answer?

Kevin Pham 2G
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Re: 14.33

Postby Kevin Pham 2G » Sun Feb 12, 2017 10:36 pm

andrea_Disc3D wrote:When the question asks to identify whether Tl^+ will disproportionate in an aqueous solution, the answer is no because Gibss free energy is positive (Given: +215kj/mol) and not spontaneous, but also K <1, right? Is this a right reasoning? I know that there is also an equation that related Gibbs Free energy and the equilibrium constant so would proving that K<1, also be a sufficient answer?


Proving that K<1 should also be a sufficient answer b/c K<1 means that reactants are more favored than products, just as a positive Gibbs free energy means that the forward reaction (formation of products) is not favored.


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