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Oxidation Numbers

Posted: Sun Feb 12, 2017 4:28 pm
by david_li3H
Hi!
I'm not sure if oxidation numbers is on the midterm (I don't remember Lavelle talking about it but I remember at discussion my TA asking a question about it so maybe I missed something?), but I'd like to ask a question on it anyways.

In a compound, is O always going to be -2, and H +1, or can it be different based on certain circumstances?
Thanks!

Re: Oxidation Numbers

Posted: Sun Feb 12, 2017 4:59 pm
by janavi_patel_2K
Typically, O is always going to be -2 and H is always going to be +1. Based on those oxidation numbers, you can use those to determine the oxidation of the other atoms in the molecule.

Re: Oxidation Numbers

Posted: Tue Mar 14, 2017 12:41 pm
by samuelkharpatin2b
The problems we are going to see in 14B will have Oxygen with an oxidation number of -2 (if in a compound) and Hydrogen with an oxidation number of +1. Using these known oxidation numbers you can find oxidation numbers of other elements in a compound, say Mn. There is an exception to the -2 rule for Oxygen, but the problems we have will have -2 as its oxidation number.

Re: Oxidation Numbers

Posted: Thu Feb 08, 2018 9:50 pm
by Jennifer Ho 1K
In most cases you'll see oxygen will have an oxidation state number of -2 (if not 0) and hydrogen will have an oxidation state of +1, so there is a point of reference to solve for the other ions that commonly have varying oxidation states. There are exceptions, but it's unlikely that you'll see them in 14B.

Re: Oxidation Numbers

Posted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 4:09 pm
by Yu Chong 2H
Oxidation numbers of O in a compound is most commonly -2, however, in peroxides like H2O2, the oxidation number of oxygen will be different. In this case, it is -1.