14.33b homework


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Janine Chan 2K
Posts: 71
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:04 am

14.33b homework

Postby Janine Chan 2K » Thu Feb 22, 2018 2:16 am

Where do we get the equation 3Tl+ --> 2Tl + Tl 3+ from? Wouldn't Tl+ e- --> Tl also be Tl+ "disproportionating" in solution?

McKenna disc 1C
Posts: 60
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:04 am

Re: 14.33b homework

Postby McKenna disc 1C » Thu Feb 22, 2018 1:31 pm

I'm a little confused about the question because I don't remember exactly what this question asks off the top of my head, but I know that the two equations you've written here will both end up with charges balanced and a net 3+ on both sides of the one equation? If that helps

Hannah Krusenoski 2L
Posts: 31
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:06 am

Re: 14.33b homework

Postby Hannah Krusenoski 2L » Fri Feb 23, 2018 1:50 am

In order to for Tl+ disproportionate in aqueous solution it must be both oxidized and reduced.

Julia Cheng 2J
Posts: 31
Joined: Thu Jul 13, 2017 3:00 am

Re: 14.33b homework

Postby Julia Cheng 2J » Fri Feb 23, 2018 11:05 am

For this problem, we know deltaG for Tl3+/Tl. However, for b we want to know the deltaG for Tl3+/Tl+ in order to find whether or not Tl is disproportionate. We use the reaction potential for Tl+/Tl to calculate deltaG for the half-reaction and then combine the deltaG's for Tl3+/Tl and Tl+/Tl in a Hess's-law-like way to find the deltaG for Tl3+-->3e-+Tl+. Since deltaG is large and positive, the reverse reaction is greatly favored so Tl+ will be disproportionate.


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