Finding n


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Ryan Danis 1J
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:18 am

Finding n

Postby Ryan Danis 1J » Thu Feb 28, 2019 3:01 pm

Is n just the number of electrons that appear on either side of each half reaction (ie: amount of electrons added to the oxidation side, that are then transferred from anode to cathode?)

Sydney To 1D
Posts: 60
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:15 am

Re: Finding n

Postby Sydney To 1D » Thu Feb 28, 2019 3:06 pm

Yes. For , n is the number of electrons that are transferred in the reaction

varunhariharan
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Joined: Mon Jan 07, 2019 8:16 am

Re: Finding n

Postby varunhariharan » Thu Feb 28, 2019 4:17 pm

n is the number of electrons being transferred. However, make sure that both half-reactions are balanced before using n, as the number of electrons being transferred should stay consistent in the equation.

monikac4k
Posts: 56
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:25 am

Re: Finding n

Postby monikac4k » Fri Mar 01, 2019 2:32 pm

When finding n, you would want to solve for both the oxidation and the reduction half reactions. Once you get there, see how many moles of electrons are transferred in the completely balanced redox reaction; this number of moles is the number you want to use for n.

Michael Novelo 4G
Posts: 64
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:28 am

Re: Finding n

Postby Michael Novelo 4G » Fri Mar 01, 2019 4:04 pm

Yes initially I believed it had to do with stoichiometric coefficients since it had to do with moles but it has to do with the oxiditation state and electrons transferred in a balanced redox equation.

Nicholas Le 4H
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:24 am

Re: Finding n

Postby Nicholas Le 4H » Fri Mar 01, 2019 4:57 pm

Yes, n is the number of moles of electrons transferred and can be found through the oxidation or reduction half reactions.

Jchellis 1I
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Re: Finding n

Postby Jchellis 1I » Sun Mar 03, 2019 10:08 pm

So it is the -e- that is in your reaction.

Mhun-Jeong Isaac Lee 1B
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:17 am

Re: Finding n

Postby Mhun-Jeong Isaac Lee 1B » Sun Mar 03, 2019 11:22 pm

Yeah a lot of people get it mixed up with the total moles of reactants and products but it is the electrons transferred. Always make sure it is the number of electrons after you balance the half-reactions and make sure the electrons cancel out.

Diana Sandoval 1K
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Re: Finding n

Postby Diana Sandoval 1K » Mon Mar 04, 2019 12:34 am

Yes, it is the amount of electrons added on both sides (of course they should be the same number).

armintaheri
Posts: 68
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:26 am

Re: Finding n

Postby armintaheri » Mon Mar 04, 2019 12:55 am

For example, if one mole of Fe were being oxidized to Fe2+, n would be 2 because 2 moles of electrons would be transferred. If Fe had a coefficient other than one, you would multiply it by 2.

Aleeque Marselian 1A
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:24 am

Re: Finding n

Postby Aleeque Marselian 1A » Mon Mar 04, 2019 9:42 am

n is the number of electrons transferred after you've balance the oxidation and half reactions.

Tony Chung 2I
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:19 am

Re: Finding n

Postby Tony Chung 2I » Mon Mar 11, 2019 8:38 pm

n is just the number of balanced electrons

Searra Harding 4I
Posts: 68
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:29 am

Re: Finding n

Postby Searra Harding 4I » Tue Mar 12, 2019 3:17 pm

So if one half reaction transfers 2 electrons and the other half reaction transfers 3 electrons, would n be 6? This way they would cancel out in the total reaction.


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