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Melting of ice

Posted: Sun Mar 03, 2019 7:50 pm
by Jose Torres
Would the melting of ice on a hot summer day correlate with or ?

Re: Melting of ice

Posted: Sun Mar 03, 2019 8:00 pm
by WilliamNguyen_4L
Delta G is less than 0.

Re: Melting of ice

Posted: Sun Mar 03, 2019 8:12 pm
by Sheridan Slaterbeck 1J
a solid to a liquid would be a spontaneous reaction so delta G would be negative.

Re: Melting of ice

Posted: Sun Mar 03, 2019 8:15 pm
by MichaelMoreno2G
As mentioned above, Delta G would be less than zero because the reaction is spontaneous.

Re: Melting of ice

Posted: Sun Mar 03, 2019 8:47 pm
by Michelle Nwufo 2G
MichaelMoreno2G wrote:As mentioned above, Delta G would be less than zero because the reaction is spontaneous.


But how do you determine whether the reaction is spontaneous or not?

Re: Melting of ice

Posted: Mon Mar 04, 2019 3:14 pm
by Jonny Schindler 1A
if you can assume the sign of the enthalpy and entropy you can sometimes use that to determine the sign of delta G.

Re: Melting of ice

Posted: Mon Mar 11, 2019 12:16 am
by Angel Chen 2k
You can determine if a reaction is spontaneous by examining mainly two factors, the entropy and whether the reaction is exothermic or endothermic. Then by plugging in these values into the Gibss free energy equation, if the answer is negative, then the reaction is spontaneous.

Re: Melting of ice

Posted: Mon Mar 11, 2019 2:16 pm
by Hannah Yates 1K
The melting of ice on a hot summers day would be spontaneous, so delta g would be negative

Re: Melting of ice

Posted: Mon Mar 11, 2019 10:41 pm
by Maddy Mackenzie
The way I looked at this question was to say that if ice was melting, delta H was positive because you are putting heat into the system. Then you can say that delta s is positive because the molecules are going to have more possible positions in a liquid than in a solid. Then if the snow is melting, the temperature must be high enough for the entropy to overcome the enthalpy and cause the delta G to be negative.

Re: Melting of ice

Posted: Tue Mar 12, 2019 12:06 am
by Alysa Rallistan 2G
This is a spontaneous reaction (dG <0 ) you can look at it as there is no work being done to the system to cause the ice to melt other than an exchange of heat from the sun to the solid ice