G=-nFE


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AngieGarcia_4F
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Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:17 am

G=-nFE

Postby AngieGarcia_4F » Mon Mar 02, 2020 2:52 pm

When we use deltaG=-nFE, how do we know what n to use?

Jasmine Fendi 1D
Posts: 108
Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:15 am

Re: G=-nFE

Postby Jasmine Fendi 1D » Mon Mar 02, 2020 2:58 pm

In this equation, n=the number of electrons transferred in the redox reaction.

Brian Tangsombatvisit 1C
Posts: 119
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:15 am

Re: G=-nFE

Postby Brian Tangsombatvisit 1C » Mon Mar 02, 2020 2:58 pm

After balancing the half reactions at the anode and cathode, and multiplying by whatever number to make the number of electrons the same in the cathode and anode half reactions, you would use the number of electrons in either the anode or cathode half reaction as n (it should be the same number for either).

Kylie Lim 4G
Posts: 110
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:15 am

Re: G=-nFE

Postby Kylie Lim 4G » Mon Mar 02, 2020 3:08 pm

n is the number of moles of electrons transferred in the reaction, and I find it easiest to use the coefficient from the balanced half reaction

Kallista McCarty 1C
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Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:18 am

Re: G=-nFE

Postby Kallista McCarty 1C » Mon Mar 02, 2020 7:02 pm

n is the number of electrons transferred. Once you balance the half reactions, the number of electrons transferred are equal to each other because they cancel out when you combine the two half reactions to create the full reaction.

Renee Grange 1I
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Re: G=-nFE

Postby Renee Grange 1I » Mon Mar 02, 2020 8:02 pm

We use this equation when calculating delta G in standard and nonstandard conditions.
In order to calculate n, you must write the reduction and oxidation half reactions, balance them, and then observe the number of electrons transferred.


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