finding n in G=-nFE


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Hannah_1G
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finding n in G=-nFE

Postby Hannah_1G » Thu Mar 05, 2020 2:36 am

How do you find n?

Ashley Tran 2I
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Re: finding n in G=-nFE

Postby Ashley Tran 2I » Thu Mar 05, 2020 8:20 am

n is the number of electron transferred which can be found when you balance the redox reaction.

Veronica_Lubera_2A
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Re: finding n in G=-nFE

Postby Veronica_Lubera_2A » Thu Mar 05, 2020 9:31 am

When you find the half reactions, n is the least common multiple of their shared electrons. So you would have to balance them. (Usually n is either 1 or 2).

Katie Kyan 2K
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Re: finding n in G=-nFE

Postby Katie Kyan 2K » Thu Mar 05, 2020 10:19 am

You can find n when you are balancing your redox reaction. n is the moles of electrons being transferred in the balanced reaction.

Mandeep Garcha 2H
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Re: finding n in G=-nFE

Postby Mandeep Garcha 2H » Thu Mar 05, 2020 10:26 am

When you write and balance the half-reactions, the mols of electrons (should be balanced to be the same in both equations) is the number you use as n in the equation.

Verity Lai 2K
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Re: finding n in G=-nFE

Postby Verity Lai 2K » Sat Mar 07, 2020 11:19 am

To find n you balance the redox reaction to determine the number of moles of electrons being transferred during the reaction.

Justin Seok 2A
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Re: finding n in G=-nFE

Postby Justin Seok 2A » Sat Mar 07, 2020 11:37 am

For example in a redox eq like Cu2+ + 2e- ---> Cu, n would be 2 since 2 electrons sre being transferred.

Nuoya Jiang
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Re: finding n in G=-nFE

Postby Nuoya Jiang » Sat Mar 07, 2020 1:38 pm

After you balance the redox reaction, the number of electrons in the overall reaction is n.

RobertXu_2J
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Re: finding n in G=-nFE

Postby RobertXu_2J » Sat Mar 07, 2020 7:26 pm

n is the number of electrons exchanged in the general reaction. So you look at the oxidation numbers, and then you look at how they have changed.

205405339
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Re: finding n in G=-nFE

Postby 205405339 » Sat Mar 07, 2020 7:53 pm

use the highest number of moles of electrons transferred according to the half reactions

Catherine Daye 1L
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Re: finding n in G=-nFE

Postby Catherine Daye 1L » Sat Mar 07, 2020 8:31 pm

You need to write out the half reactions first. When you combine the half reactions, n is the number of electrons on either side of the equation (they cancel each other out).

Jamie Lee 1F
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Re: finding n in G=-nFE

Postby Jamie Lee 1F » Sat Mar 07, 2020 9:38 pm

n is the number of electrons being transferred in the redox equation.

Nicholas_Gladkov_2J
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Re: finding n in G=-nFE

Postby Nicholas_Gladkov_2J » Sat Mar 07, 2020 11:08 pm

Hannah_1G wrote:How do you find n?


"n" is found by finding the two half reactions, and balancing them.
When balancing the half reactions, in order to balance the two half reaction charges, you will add electrons. The number of electrons in the reaction is the value of "n".

faithkim1L
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Re: finding n in G=-nFE

Postby faithkim1L » Sun Mar 08, 2020 12:33 am

n is the number of electrons transferred in a redox reaction.

Jasmine Vallarta 2L
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Re: finding n in G=-nFE

Postby Jasmine Vallarta 2L » Sun Mar 08, 2020 10:56 am

you can find n after balancing the half rxns. the number of e- should cancel out and that number = n

Cindy Adiwidjaja 1B
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Re: finding n in G=-nFE

Postby Cindy Adiwidjaja 1B » Sun Mar 08, 2020 11:23 pm

"n" is the number of balanced electrons on both sides.


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