n in NFE


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Karina Kong 2H
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Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:16 am

n in NFE

Postby Karina Kong 2H » Sun Mar 08, 2020 11:48 pm

For n in the equation Delta G=-nFE, how do you know how many moles you need?

Sidharth D 1E
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Re: n in NFE

Postby Sidharth D 1E » Sun Mar 08, 2020 11:50 pm

N should be the number of electrons transferred in that scenario.

lilymayek_1E
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Re: n in NFE

Postby lilymayek_1E » Sun Mar 08, 2020 11:57 pm

When you are solving for a redox reaction, and you split the original reaction into its respective half-reactions, you have to balance both the molecules involved and the electrons transferred. That final balanced value of electrons transferred is your n value. The top answer in this forum helps!
https://chemistry.stackexchange.com/questions/5122/how-is-it-determined-how-many-electrons-are-transferred-in-redox-reactions

J Medina 2I
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Re: n in NFE

Postby J Medina 2I » Sun Mar 08, 2020 11:59 pm

n is the number of electrons transferred which cannot be determined until your redox half-reactions are balanced. These half-reactions should have the same number of electrons transferred on opposite sides.

SarahCoufal_1k
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Re: n in NFE

Postby SarahCoufal_1k » Mon Mar 09, 2020 12:00 am

n is the number of electrons transferred in the redox equation. When you do your reduction half reaction there is a certain amount of electrons transferred and same case for the oxidation half reaction. You then have to multiply the equations to balance the electrons. when they match and cancel that number is n

Jesse H 2L
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Re: n in NFE

Postby Jesse H 2L » Mon Mar 09, 2020 12:01 am

the moles of electrons transferred

Kaitlyn Ang 1J
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Re: n in NFE

Postby Kaitlyn Ang 1J » Mon Mar 09, 2020 12:02 am

After you balance the redox reactions so that the "number" of electrons from the half reactions cancel, that common "number" of electrons is your n

Eesha Chattopadhyay 2K
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Re: n in NFE

Postby Eesha Chattopadhyay 2K » Mon Mar 09, 2020 12:03 am

n is the number of moles of electrons that are transferred.

Nawal Dandachi 1G
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Re: n in NFE

Postby Nawal Dandachi 1G » Mon Mar 09, 2020 12:04 am

n is the number of moles of electrons transferred

Sanjana K - 2F
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Re: n in NFE

Postby Sanjana K - 2F » Mon Mar 09, 2020 12:30 am

Remember that it's the number of electrons after you balance your equations (so the number of electrons transferred in the cathode half reaction should equal the number of electrons transferred in the anode half reaction, which should equal your value of n).

Charlene Datu 2E
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Re: n in NFE

Postby Charlene Datu 2E » Thu Mar 12, 2020 4:42 pm

Since it's n is the number of moles of electrons in the reaction after both half-reactions are balanced, it's good to note that it doesn't matter which half-reaction you take this value from. This value should be the same in both half-reactions.

Hope Hyland 2D
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Re: n in NFE

Postby Hope Hyland 2D » Thu Mar 12, 2020 4:45 pm

n is the number of electrons being transferred (after balancing the half-reactions)

Ryan Yoon 1L
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Joined: Mon Jul 01, 2019 12:15 am

Re: n in NFE

Postby Ryan Yoon 1L » Thu Mar 12, 2020 9:49 pm

n is the whole number mole value of electrons that were shared in the half reactions.

Ryan Yoon 1L
Posts: 55
Joined: Mon Jul 01, 2019 12:15 am

Re: n in NFE

Postby Ryan Yoon 1L » Thu Mar 12, 2020 9:49 pm

n is the whole number mole value of electrons that were shared in the half reactions.

ramiro_romero
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Re: n in NFE

Postby ramiro_romero » Thu Mar 12, 2020 10:09 pm

n is how many moles of electrons are transferred. First you need to determine the half rxns, then balance the oxidation and reducing reactions so that the electrons cancel out (and don't appear in overall rxn). Finally, once both half rxns are balanced, the coeffecient of both electrons is your value for n.

Kaylee Clarke 1G
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Re: n in NFE

Postby Kaylee Clarke 1G » Sat Mar 14, 2020 11:49 am

n is referring the electrons transferred after balancing the half-reaction!

Altamash Mahsud 1I
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Re: n in NFE

Postby Altamash Mahsud 1I » Sat Mar 14, 2020 12:10 pm

The n in that equation is not the number of moles, but it is instead the number of electrons being transferred in the redox reaction. You can get this number by balancing the redox half reactions and combining these half reactions to get the completed redox reaction, which will tell you the number of transferred electrons.

ThomasNguyen_Dis1H
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Re: n in NFE

Postby ThomasNguyen_Dis1H » Sat Mar 14, 2020 12:42 pm

n is the number of electrons transferred in the final equation

205154661_Dis2J
Posts: 109
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:21 am

Re: n in NFE

Postby 205154661_Dis2J » Sat Mar 14, 2020 4:17 pm

N stands for the number of electrons transferred. So you would have to separate your redox rxns into the reduction and oxidation rxn in order to see how many electrons are being transferred after you balanced both reactions.

chimerila
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Re: n in NFE

Postby chimerila » Sat Mar 14, 2020 6:13 pm

It can be kind of confusing, especially since I'm so used to seeing "n" and thinking "MOLES". But to help myself, I like to remember that we're using this equation when solving problems related to electrochemistry, so "n" actually signifies electrons.

"E"lectrochemistry ------> "e"lectrons :)


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