Nernst Equation  [ENDORSED]


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Nasir_Ahmed
Posts: 25
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:58 pm

Nernst Equation

Postby Nasir_Ahmed » Sat Feb 04, 2017 1:11 pm

Hey guys, I wasn't able to make lecture on Friday but I looked through the course reader and I'm confused with the Nernst Equation. How is the variable 0.05916 derived?

Miya McLaughlin 2B
Posts: 24
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:57 pm
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Re: Nernst Equation  [ENDORSED]

Postby Miya McLaughlin 2B » Sat Feb 04, 2017 1:26 pm

The 0.0592 comes from combining all the constants in the equations. It represents RT/F, which is the gas constant multiplied by the temperature (in this case it's the standard temp of 273 K), then it is divided by one Faraday(F) which is 96485 C/mol.

The n remains a variable because it depends on the number of moles of electrons that are being transferred.

There is also another value of 2.303 that you multiply RT by to get 0.0592. This allows you to change the ln to log10.
This makes it easier to work with pH values later on.

In summary: 0.0592 = 2.303RT / F

Brandon N 3A
Posts: 7
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:56 pm

Re: Nernst Equation

Postby Brandon N 3A » Sat Feb 04, 2017 5:34 pm

The standard temp T is actually 298K (25 degrees celsius)

NinaSheridan
Posts: 30
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:58 pm

Re: Nernst Equation

Postby NinaSheridan » Tue Feb 14, 2017 12:24 am

But (298)(8.314)/(964853) = .025678, not .05916, so where is .05916 coming from? A different form of the gas constant? A different temperature??

Shushanna S 3F
Posts: 24
Joined: Sat Jul 09, 2016 3:00 am

Re: Nernst Equation

Postby Shushanna S 3F » Tue Feb 14, 2017 12:39 pm

Faraday's constant is actually 96,485.3. There's a typo on the back of the laminated periodic table. I checked in our lecture notes for the course reader and it's given as 96,485. (I think the .3 was left off but you can double check.)


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