E˚ vs E


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Diana Sandoval 1K
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E˚ vs E

Postby Diana Sandoval 1K » Tue Feb 26, 2019 1:59 pm

What is the difference between E˚and E?

mbaker4E
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Re: E˚ vs E

Postby mbaker4E » Tue Feb 26, 2019 2:16 pm

I believe E˚refers to standard conditions and E refers to nonstandard conditions.

Fiona Jackson 1D
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Re: E˚ vs E

Postby Fiona Jackson 1D » Tue Feb 26, 2019 2:16 pm

Hi! The E nautical (with the circle) means E at standard conditions. The E, however, is just the cell potential in general under any conditions.

Vicky Lu 1L
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:18 am

Re: E˚ vs E

Postby Vicky Lu 1L » Tue Feb 26, 2019 2:53 pm

E˚ means that it is under standard condition which is T=298K and P=1 atm. E would then be the cell potential at a different temperature and or pressure. We can assume standard condition unless stated otherwise.

Luc Lorain 1L
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Re: E˚ vs E

Postby Luc Lorain 1L » Sat Mar 02, 2019 4:22 pm

Eo is constant for each reaction, since it represents the cell reaction under very specific conditions (the standard state, 1 atm pressure and 25 oC).
E can vary, even within the same cell, as different experimental conditions impact the result of the reaction.

MadelynNguyen1F
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Re: E˚ vs E

Postby MadelynNguyen1F » Sat Mar 02, 2019 5:21 pm

E˚ is the standard electrode potential under standard conditions while E is the cell potential under other conditions

Nicole Garrido 2I
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Re: E˚ vs E

Postby Nicole Garrido 2I » Sat Mar 02, 2019 5:52 pm

E˚ is the standard and E is in a specific reaction. E˚ does not change through a reaction because the element is in its most stable state but E changes as the reaction goes on because the element may change because its not in its most stable state.

Charles Gu 1D
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Re: E˚ vs E

Postby Charles Gu 1D » Sat Mar 02, 2019 7:09 pm

E˚ is under standard conditions such as 1 atm and 298 K while E is under any other condition.

Xingzheng Sun 2K
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Re: E˚ vs E

Postby Xingzheng Sun 2K » Fri Mar 08, 2019 4:19 am

E and E°can be calculated by the formula E = E°- (RT/nF) lnQ.

Sarah_Kang_2K
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Re: E˚ vs E

Postby Sarah_Kang_2K » Fri Mar 08, 2019 10:12 am

E˚is under standard conditions (pressure=1 bar, concentration= 1 mol/L, etc.)

Theodore_Herring_1A
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Re: E˚ vs E

Postby Theodore_Herring_1A » Fri Mar 08, 2019 10:21 am

E˚ is standard conditions, and will be given to you on a formula sheet or in the question for many reactions. E is nonstandard and has to be calculated using data.

Nicolle Fernandez 1E
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Re: E˚ vs E

Postby Nicolle Fernandez 1E » Mon Mar 11, 2019 3:51 pm

E naut is for standard conditions while E is for non standard conditions

Kyither Min 2K
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Re: E˚ vs E

Postby Kyither Min 2K » Wed Mar 13, 2019 2:48 pm

E˚ refers to the cell potential of a cell at standard conditions (25 degrees celsius, 1 M and 1 atm) and so it is a constant value that is given and will not change. E refers to the cell potential of a cell at any time, whether or not it's at standard conditions.

Cole Elsner 2J
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Re: E˚ vs E

Postby Cole Elsner 2J » Wed Mar 13, 2019 3:11 pm

E* refers to cell potential at standard conditions, it does NOT change with amount of substance. E is just the potential of the cell under ANY conditions.


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