6N.1.b)


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EthanPham_1G
Posts: 104
Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2019 12:17 am

6N.1.b)

Postby EthanPham_1G » Mon Mar 02, 2020 12:33 am

I solved for K for part b) In3+ + U3+ --> In2+ + U4+ and I didn't get the same answer as the solution guide? I used the Nernst equation and got around K=100 but the solutions in the back says 1x10^4. Can someone explain how to solve this problem?

Justin Sarquiz 2F
Posts: 106
Joined: Fri Aug 30, 2019 12:15 am

Re: 6N.1.b)

Postby Justin Sarquiz 2F » Mon Mar 02, 2020 8:30 am

I think the book made a mistake because I got K=107. The book said that 2 electrons were transferred, but it should be that one electron was transferred.

rachelle1K
Posts: 109
Joined: Sat Sep 07, 2019 12:16 am

Re: 6N.1.b)

Postby rachelle1K » Tue Mar 03, 2020 11:20 pm

Justin Sarquiz 2F wrote:I think the book made a mistake because I got K=107. The book said that 2 electrons were transferred, but it should be that one electron was transferred.


I also got K=107

Caroline Beecher 2H
Posts: 51
Joined: Wed Nov 14, 2018 12:21 am

Re: 6N.1.b)

Postby Caroline Beecher 2H » Wed Mar 04, 2020 8:38 am

I also got K = 107, maybe there is a mistake in the solutions for the textbook.

Jared Khoo 1G
Posts: 107
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:16 am

Re: 6N.1.b)

Postby Jared Khoo 1G » Wed Mar 04, 2020 7:54 pm

Yeah you would get 1*10^4 if 2 electrons were transferred but that is not the case here. The answer should be 107


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