Textbook Problems 15.3 and 15.5

Moderators: Chem_Mod, Chem_Admin

mrao25
Posts: 12
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Textbook Problems 15.3 and 15.5

Postby mrao25 » Sun Feb 14, 2016 8:30 pm

I was wondering as to why in 15.3, we divide by the number of moles from the equation (such as part c where we divide by 2 for the moles of NO2), whereas in 15.5 we multiply by the number of moles (such as part a where we multiply by 3 for the moles of O2)?

Thanks!

Carmille Vega 1C
Posts: 17
Joined: Wed Oct 07, 2015 3:00 am

Re: Textbook Problems 15.3 and 15.5

Postby Carmille Vega 1C » Sun Feb 14, 2016 9:44 pm

Part c of 15.3 asks for the the unique rate of reaction, which is the rate of change of the reactant(s)/stoichiometric coefficient. So you divide the rate of change of 2NO2(g), -6.5, by the stoichiometric coefficient of 2NO2(g), which is 2. Part a of 15.5 asks for something different, which is simply the rate of reaction (notice how it's not the unique rate of reaction).

Rachel Lipman
Posts: 45
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Re: Textbook Problems 15.3 and 15.5

Postby Rachel Lipman » Mon Feb 15, 2016 3:56 pm

In the solutions manual, 15.3 part c is depicted as the second b.

Helen Shi 1J
Posts: 78
Joined: Sat Jul 22, 2017 3:00 am

Re: Textbook Problems 15.3 and 15.5

Postby Helen Shi 1J » Mon Feb 26, 2018 10:34 pm

How come the textbook answer for 15.3 part a) is 6.5 x 10^-3 mol/L*s? Why did they not divide by the number of moles (2)?

Adrian Lim 1G
Posts: 88
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:03 am

Re: Textbook Problems 15.3 and 15.5

Postby Adrian Lim 1G » Tue Feb 27, 2018 10:06 pm

I think the answer in the solutions manual shows the rate of reaction of NO2 in this specific reaction, so it doesn't divide by 2 for part a

Katelyn 2E
Posts: 35
Joined: Sat Jul 22, 2017 3:01 am

Re: Textbook Problems 15.3 and 15.5

Postby Katelyn 2E » Wed Feb 28, 2018 10:17 am

also regarding this question, is there a difference in how we should calculate rate of reaction and rate of formation?

William Xu Dis 1D
Posts: 31
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:05 am

Re: Textbook Problems 15.3 and 15.5

Postby William Xu Dis 1D » Wed Feb 28, 2018 12:49 pm

Just remember that the rate of the reaction (unique rate of the reaction) is always the rate of either formation of a product or consumption of a reactant divided by the coefficient of that product or reactant in the balanced chemical equation. For calculating the rate of a formation, you simply divide concentration change by change in time. Coefficients are only used when relating rates of one reactant or product to another reactant or product, such as when calculating the unique rate of the reaction.

Cristina Sarmiento 1E
Posts: 52
Joined: Wed Nov 16, 2016 3:02 am

Re: Textbook Problems 15.3 and 15.5

Postby Cristina Sarmiento 1E » Wed Feb 28, 2018 4:20 pm

So when you are calculating the rate of reaction that is not the unique rate of reaction, you multiply the concentration by the coefficient?


Return to “Kinetics vs. Thermodynamics Controlling a Reaction”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest