k'

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604735966
Posts: 22
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:59 pm

k'

Postby 604735966 » Tue Feb 21, 2017 7:39 pm

Can someone explain to me what k' actually is and when we would use it? Is it simply the rate constant for a reverse reaction?

emma_arago_3D
Posts: 12
Joined: Tue Sep 27, 2016 3:00 am

Re: k'

Postby emma_arago_3D » Tue Feb 21, 2017 7:59 pm

As far as my understanding, yes, it is simply the rate constant for a reverse reaction. It can be used to evaluate K or k in the equation K=k/k' (looking at the relationship between equilibrium constant and rate constant).

Olivia_Chen_3E
Posts: 18
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:59 pm

Re: k'

Postby Olivia_Chen_3E » Sun Feb 26, 2017 10:44 pm

Yes, even though there is a ' mark after the k, it doesn't have anything to do with differentiating the rate constant k, it's just do indicate that it is the rate constant of the reverse reaction, which only occurs for fast reactions, and for slow reactions, k' can be disregarded, as the reaction is over before the reverse reaction has much effect on the rate law of the reaction itself.

alondra_1D
Posts: 17
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:59 pm

Re: k'

Postby alondra_1D » Sun Feb 26, 2017 11:00 pm

Yea, k' is just the reverse reaction, I don't know what else we would use it with besides, K=k/k'.

Wesley_Rugen_1E
Posts: 23
Joined: Fri Jul 22, 2016 3:00 am

Re: k'

Postby Wesley_Rugen_1E » Sun Mar 19, 2017 1:12 pm

It doesn't have anything to do with the differentiation of the rate constant. It is just the reverse rate - we can use it to find K.


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