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speed of reaction based on activation energy

Posted: Thu Feb 28, 2019 5:07 am
by FrankieClarke2C
If a reaction has a higher activation energy, does this mean that the reaction is slower?

Re: speed of reaction based on activation energy

Posted: Thu Feb 28, 2019 5:27 am
by Dimitri Speron 1C
Yes, generally. This is because the reaction will require a greater buildup of heat in order to reach the energy of its transition state.

Re: speed of reaction based on activation energy

Posted: Thu Feb 28, 2019 12:50 pm
by fgalasso1b
It is because since you need more energy to build up, the longer it takes to acquire the energy for the reaction to take place.

Re: speed of reaction based on activation energy

Posted: Thu Feb 28, 2019 1:12 pm
by JT Wechsler 2B
Typically this is the case. To have a reaction occur, you have to meet a set amount of energy (the activation energy) to have a reaction proceed. Typically the higher the activation energy is, the more energy will be needed to be put into the system.

Re: speed of reaction based on activation energy

Posted: Thu Feb 28, 2019 1:15 pm
by mbaker4E
Yes, because more energy is necessary in order for the reaction to move forward.

Re: speed of reaction based on activation energy

Posted: Fri Mar 01, 2019 9:26 am
by Lorena Zhang 4E
Yes. To add on that, when adding catalyst, you increase the rate of reaction because the activation energy barrier is lowered so that the reaction can proceed faster.

Re: speed of reaction based on activation energy

Posted: Tue Mar 05, 2019 4:52 pm
by Vanadium Wang 4H
Typically yes because the reaction will require a greater buildup of energy to overcome the activation barrier. Take a look at the Arrhenius Equation:
k = Ae^-(EA/RT)
A higher activation energy would result in a slower reaction.