Diamond Reaction

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Justin Vayakone 1C
Posts: 110
Joined: Sat Sep 07, 2019 12:19 am

Diamond Reaction

Postby Justin Vayakone 1C » Wed Feb 26, 2020 4:03 pm

Lavelle said that the reaction from diamond to graphite was spontaneous but had a very high activation energy and would occur very slowly. Does this mean that over time, say a few trillions years, the diamond is slowly collecting enough energy to overcome the energy barrier? Or would the reaction ever happen without any energy and is just waiting for a huge burst of energy in order to overcome the activation energy? I know once it overcomes the activation energy, it'll give out more energy than it took in, but just wondering why we call the reaction "very slow" if it actually doesn't happen without the necessary energy.

Keya Jonnalagadda 1A
Posts: 50
Joined: Mon Jun 17, 2019 7:24 am

Re: Diamond Reaction

Postby Keya Jonnalagadda 1A » Wed Feb 26, 2020 6:43 pm

The speed of a reaction depends on kinetics, which means that the magnitude of activation energy determines the speed of the reaction. This is why catalysts like enzymes, that lower the activation energy, increase the speed of the reaction.
In terms of the diamond reaction, which has high activation energy as Professor Lavelle said, this would explain why the reaction happens so slowly even though it's spontaneous.

Ryan Yoon 1L
Posts: 55
Joined: Mon Jul 01, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Diamond Reaction

Postby Ryan Yoon 1L » Fri Feb 28, 2020 10:47 am

Since Kinetics dictates the speed of chemical reactions, the diamond reaction is very very slow due to high energy activation barrier.

905373636
Posts: 62
Joined: Thu Aug 01, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Diamond Reaction

Postby 905373636 » Fri Feb 28, 2020 12:21 pm

Justin Vayakone 1C wrote:Lavelle said that the reaction from diamond to graphite was spontaneous but had a very high activation energy and would occur very slowly. Does this mean that over time, say a few trillions years, the diamond is slowly collecting enough energy to overcome the energy barrier? Or would the reaction ever happen without any energy and is just waiting for a huge burst of energy in order to overcome the activation energy? I know once it overcomes the activation energy, it'll give out more energy than it took in, but just wondering why we call the reaction "very slow" if it actually doesn't happen without the necessary energy.


Does this also mean, as the entropy of the universe increases to infinity, that all/most diamond will react to graphite in the eventual heat death of the universe?

Amy Pham 1D
Posts: 103
Joined: Fri Aug 09, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Diamond Reaction

Postby Amy Pham 1D » Fri Feb 28, 2020 1:40 pm

905373636 wrote:
Justin Vayakone 1C wrote:Lavelle said that the reaction from diamond to graphite was spontaneous but had a very high activation energy and would occur very slowly. Does this mean that over time, say a few trillions years, the diamond is slowly collecting enough energy to overcome the energy barrier? Or would the reaction ever happen without any energy and is just waiting for a huge burst of energy in order to overcome the activation energy? I know once it overcomes the activation energy, it'll give out more energy than it took in, but just wondering why we call the reaction "very slow" if it actually doesn't happen without the necessary energy.


Does this also mean, as the entropy of the universe increases to infinity, that all/most diamond will react to graphite in the eventual heat death of the universe?

In a scheme as grand as this one dealing with the heat death of the universe, presumably so.


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