Instantaneous Rate

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Giselle Littleton 1F
Posts: 78
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:20 am

Instantaneous Rate

Postby Giselle Littleton 1F » Sun Mar 08, 2020 9:57 pm

How does the instantaneous rate react as the reaction proceeds?

805394719
Posts: 104
Joined: Wed Sep 11, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Instantaneous Rate

Postby 805394719 » Sun Mar 08, 2020 10:03 pm

The instantaneous rate decreases as the reaction proceeds because the reactants are consumed and less amount of reactant is left in the reaction which causes the rate of the reaction to decrease since the number of collisions between the reactants decreases and the change in the reactant concentration becomes less which causes the tangent to the plot of its concentration against time to become less steep as the reaction proceeds since the rate has decreased and the plot started to approach a straight vertical line as the reactant concentrations remain unchanged at equilibrium.

Zoya Mulji 1K
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Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Instantaneous Rate

Postby Zoya Mulji 1K » Sun Mar 08, 2020 10:04 pm

If you look at the curve graph for the concentration v. time, you can tell that the rate is very quick at first when the concentration is high and decreases as time increases.

Martina
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Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Instantaneous Rate

Postby Martina » Sun Mar 08, 2020 11:11 pm

The rate is high as the reaction begins because there are more reactants, as the concentration of reactants decreases, the rate decreases.

AGaeta_2C
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Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:21 am

Re: Instantaneous Rate

Postby AGaeta_2C » Sun Mar 08, 2020 11:13 pm

Instantaneous rate decreases as time increases

Hussain Chharawalla 1G
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Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Instantaneous Rate

Postby Hussain Chharawalla 1G » Sun Mar 08, 2020 11:17 pm

I believe instantaneous rate becomes 0 when the reaction reaches equilibrium

Adriana_4F
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:29 am

Re: Instantaneous Rate

Postby Adriana_4F » Sun Mar 08, 2020 11:19 pm

Instantaneous rate decreases as time increases and becomes 0 when equilibrium is reached

305385703
Posts: 102
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Instantaneous Rate

Postby 305385703 » Mon Mar 09, 2020 11:14 am

The instantaneous rate of change decreases as the reaction proceeds. The reaction gets closer to equilibrium and so the rate decreases.

805422680
Posts: 103
Joined: Sat Sep 14, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Instantaneous Rate

Postby 805422680 » Mon Mar 09, 2020 11:27 am

The rate is very high when the reaction starts and decreases as the reaction continues. This can be determined by the slope of the tangent line at that point of the curve

Sara Richmond 2K
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Joined: Fri Aug 30, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Instantaneous Rate

Postby Sara Richmond 2K » Tue Mar 10, 2020 10:55 am

Instantaneously was rate decreases with time. If you think about it, it makes sense that the reaction would slow as more of the reactants have been used up;.

John Liang 2I
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Joined: Fri Aug 30, 2019 12:18 am

Re: Instantaneous Rate

Postby John Liang 2I » Tue Mar 10, 2020 10:57 am

looking at it graphically, the curve downwards will make the line tangent to the curve less and less steep. since the instantaneous rate is dependent on the slope of the tangent line, it will decrease over time. hope this helps

Ruby Richter 2L
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Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Instantaneous Rate

Postby Ruby Richter 2L » Wed Mar 11, 2020 3:51 pm

Is there a case where the instantaneous rate increases with time?

Shivam Rana 1D
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Joined: Fri Aug 09, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Instantaneous Rate

Postby Shivam Rana 1D » Wed Mar 11, 2020 4:21 pm

The instantaneous rate should decrease with time.

CameronDis2K
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Joined: Wed Feb 20, 2019 12:18 am

Re: Instantaneous Rate

Postby CameronDis2K » Sat Mar 14, 2020 12:02 pm

As the reaction proceeds, think of it as a curved graph (seen with the equilibrium reaction graph, with E), the initial rate is very high as there is a readily amount of reactant available to react, and as its used up less reactant is available, so the reaction rate goes down (as reaction rate depends on concentration of reactants), eventually it will level out when all the products are formed (curved graph situation).


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