Activation Energy and Energy of a Reaction

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Brandon Tao 1K
Posts: 100
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:15 am

Activation Energy and Energy of a Reaction

Postby Brandon Tao 1K » Sun Mar 15, 2020 9:41 pm

I wasn't sure where to categorize this post but how does changing temperature change the rate of reaction?

Kennedi2J
Posts: 101
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:20 am

Re: Activation Energy and Energy of a Reaction

Postby Kennedi2J » Sun Mar 15, 2020 9:50 pm

The rate constant, k, is dependent on temperature and directly proportional to it. An increase in temperature would increase k and speed up a reaction.

Aarushi Solanki 4F
Posts: 107
Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Activation Energy and Energy of a Reaction

Postby Aarushi Solanki 4F » Sun Mar 15, 2020 10:54 pm

Because k is directly proportional to temperature, it would increase with an increase in temperature.

PranaviKolla2B
Posts: 114
Joined: Fri Aug 30, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Activation Energy and Energy of a Reaction

Postby PranaviKolla2B » Sun Mar 15, 2020 11:30 pm

Would a decrease in temperature accordingly lower the value of k?

Daniel Yu 1E
Posts: 100
Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Activation Energy and Energy of a Reaction

Postby Daniel Yu 1E » Sun Mar 15, 2020 11:33 pm

You can look at arrhenius' equation to see the relationship between reaction rate and temperature.

andrewcj 2C
Posts: 102
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Activation Energy and Energy of a Reaction

Postby andrewcj 2C » Sun Mar 15, 2020 11:39 pm

It's important to consider whether the reaction is exothermic or endothermic when trying to determine the outcome of changing temperature on a reaction. If the reaction is is exothermic, raising temperature will favor the reverse reaction, which means it will increase the rate of the reverse reaction more than it increases the rate of the forward reaction. The opposite is true for endothermic reactions, in that the rate of the forward reaction will increase more than the rate of the reverse reaction.


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