When B and C is significantly larger than A


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Julianne Seog 3K
Posts: 24
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:58 pm

When B and C is significantly larger than A

Postby Julianne Seog 3K » Thu Feb 23, 2017 10:00 pm

In the course reader, it says if the concentration of B and C is significantly larger than A then the reaction rate depends only on A. How much is "significantly larger" so that this rule can apply?

Johnson Thai 1L
Posts: 19
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:59 pm

Re: When B and C is significantly larger than A

Postby Johnson Thai 1L » Thu Feb 23, 2017 11:50 pm

I believe it is just "significantly large" enough so that the concentrations of B and C remain constant when A is being used up. This way, as stated in the Course Reader, the reaction rate depends on just concentration of A.

Cherry_Deng_1K
Posts: 12
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:55 pm

Re: When B and C is significantly larger than A

Postby Cherry_Deng_1K » Thu Feb 23, 2017 11:55 pm

Also, I am pretty sure a question will tell you that the concentrations of B and C are significantly larger than A. You will probably not know to write a pseudo-first-order rate law (or other order depending on the reaction) otherwise.

ChristinaRoble3J
Posts: 14
Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2016 3:00 am

Re: When B and C is significantly larger than A

Postby ChristinaRoble3J » Fri Feb 24, 2017 12:47 am

I also don't understand this in my opinion "significantly large" is very subjective, so I am also confused as to how we know if one or two of the reactants are in "large excess" in comparison to another. I hope lavelle goes over this.


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