Overall order  [ENDORSED]


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Nina Gautam 1K
Posts: 52
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:04 am

Overall order

Postby Nina Gautam 1K » Wed Feb 28, 2018 4:50 pm

Are we responsible for knowing overall order of a reaction rate if the reaction has a rate law that depends on the concentrations of more than one reactant? Also will we need to know about fractional or negative orders?
Thanks!

Lucian1F
Posts: 87
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:07 am
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Re: Overall order  [ENDORSED]

Postby Lucian1F » Wed Feb 28, 2018 5:09 pm

We don't need to know negative or fractional orders but if you know the orders of all the reactants you should know that the overall order is just the sum of those individual orders

Maria1E
Posts: 61
Joined: Sat Jul 22, 2017 3:01 am

Re: Overall order

Postby Maria1E » Wed Feb 28, 2018 6:39 pm

To find the overall order, you simply add the orders of all the reactants. For example, the order of [A]^3[B]^1 is 4.

Jennie Fox 1D
Posts: 66
Joined: Sat Jul 22, 2017 3:01 am

Re: Overall order

Postby Jennie Fox 1D » Wed Feb 28, 2018 10:15 pm

After figuring out the order of each reactant, you just add the orders together to get the overall order

JamesAntonios 1E
Posts: 70
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:04 am

Re: Overall order

Postby JamesAntonios 1E » Wed Feb 28, 2018 10:36 pm

We will need to know the overall order, if given experimental data (in order to right a rate law). However, for integrated rate laws, as of right now, we are only are dealing with zero, first, and second orders, and only one reactant.

Abigail Urbina 1K
Posts: 102
Joined: Thu Jul 27, 2017 3:01 am

Re: Overall order

Postby Abigail Urbina 1K » Thu Mar 01, 2018 8:16 am

To find the overall order of a reaction, you can simply add all the individual orders of each reactant in a reaction.

104922499 1F
Posts: 53
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:04 am

Re: Overall order

Postby 104922499 1F » Sat Mar 03, 2018 12:11 pm

Question #15 in the hw can help with understanding this. reactants [CH3Br] and [OH-] both end in having the order = 1 (n=1, m=1) so if you add n and m you get 2. the OVERALL reaction order is 2 while the individual reactions have the reaction order of 1.


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