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15.5

Posted: Tue Mar 06, 2018 9:55 pm
by Cristina Sarmiento 1E
Why do we multiply the unique rate by the coefficient of oxygen to find its rate and multiply the unique rate by the coefficient of water to find its rate? Why don't we divide the unique rate by the coefficient?

Re: 15.5

Posted: Tue Mar 06, 2018 10:06 pm
by RohanGupta1G
Im pretty sure the unique rate refers to only 1 mole of reactant in the reaction. Since there are three moles of oxygen we multiple the unique rate by 3.

Re: 15.5

Posted: Tue Mar 06, 2018 10:14 pm
by Cristina Sarmiento 1E
I thought the unique average rate law took into account the stoichiometric coefficients so it's not necessarily just one mole

Re: 15.5

Posted: Tue Mar 06, 2018 10:18 pm
by Cristina Sarmiento 1E
Someone please correct me if I am wrong, but do we multiply the unique average rate by the coefficients (for e.g. oxygen) to find its rate because the unique average rate already took into account its coefficients and now we just have to multiply it back?