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Unique rates

Posted: Fri Mar 01, 2019 3:10 pm
by madisondesilva1c
Even though a unique rate is the same for all concentrations of products of reactants, does it still change with time. Therefore can a unique rate at the beginning of the reaction be different than the unique rate at the end since it is a function of time?

Re: Unique rates

Posted: Fri Mar 01, 2019 8:08 pm
by michelle
Yes. Unique rate is spontaneous rate, which will definitely change with time. But we usually talk about the initial rate.

Re: Unique rates

Posted: Fri Mar 01, 2019 8:42 pm
by Parth Mungra
To build off that, we talk about the initial rate of the reactants going to the products only, and not the reverse reaction. This makes our analysis and our calculations nicer.

Re: Unique rates

Posted: Sat Mar 02, 2019 3:14 pm
by 105169446
Yes, because the unique rate is an instantaneous rate which means it is different at each point in time.

Re: Unique rates

Posted: Sat Mar 02, 2019 3:38 pm
by Alyssa Wilson 2A
How do you know when to solve for a unique rate, rather than just a normal instantaneous rate? Is it when there is only one [R] and one [P] on either side of the reaction?

Re: Unique rates

Posted: Sat Mar 02, 2019 3:55 pm
by Katie_Duong_1D
A unique rate is the rate of appearance/disappearance of a chemical species, divided by the stoichiometric coefficients. The unique rate changes over time as the reaction continues.