does k change if rxn is multiplied?


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aisteles1G
Posts: 117
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:15 am

does k change if rxn is multiplied?

Postby aisteles1G » Tue Mar 05, 2019 6:03 pm

If you find the rate constant on a table but the rxn you have is multiplied by 2 of the table rxn, would you mulitply the Kr (rate constant) by 2, or raise it to the 2 power? Or is Kr independent of the reaction?

Shubham Rai 2C
Posts: 64
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:27 am

Re: does k change if rxn is multiplied?

Postby Shubham Rai 2C » Tue Mar 05, 2019 6:59 pm

The Kr shouldn't really change as when you multiply the rxn, both the reactants and products will be affected and should cancel the multiplication.

LeannaPhan14BDis1D
Posts: 57
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:16 am

Re: does k change if rxn is multiplied?

Postby LeannaPhan14BDis1D » Tue Mar 05, 2019 7:14 pm

it shouldn't change when rxn is multiplied

Erin Kim 2G
Posts: 75
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:26 am

Re: does k change if rxn is multiplied?

Postby Erin Kim 2G » Tue Mar 05, 2019 7:31 pm

k should not change even if the coefficients are changed.

Sean Reyes 1J
Posts: 67
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:24 am

Re: does k change if rxn is multiplied?

Postby Sean Reyes 1J » Tue Mar 05, 2019 9:23 pm

Because k represents the rate constant, the value of k will never change for a unique reaction. That is to say, k itself will stay stagnant for that particular reaction. "Multiplying the table" by a factor of two would just change the concentration of the reactants, which would change the rate of the reaction, but not the rate constant.

904914909
Posts: 60
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:26 am

Re: does k change if rxn is multiplied?

Postby 904914909 » Wed Mar 06, 2019 5:26 pm

k is a constant for the equation so it should not change if the rxn is multiplied

kamalkolluri
Posts: 65
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:17 am
Been upvoted: 1 time

Re: does k change if rxn is multiplied?

Postby kamalkolluri » Wed Mar 06, 2019 6:24 pm

k doesn't change because it is the same value for the equation.


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