Finding n

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Michelle Lee 2E
Posts: 64
Joined: Thu Jul 27, 2017 3:01 am

Finding n

Postby Michelle Lee 2E » Sat Mar 10, 2018 11:15 pm

What if the n value we calculate using the method of initial rates was not a whole number but some weird decimal?

Emilie Hoffman 1E
Posts: 55
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:04 am

Re: Finding n

Postby Emilie Hoffman 1E » Sat Mar 10, 2018 11:49 pm

Then it might not be the actual n of the specific concentration you're looking for. My TA said that is should always be close enough to a whole number for you to easily round it, even if it's off a little. Also, I'm confused as to how you're directly calculating n because we usually compare the ratios of the observed rate change and the change in concentration, which determines which n value you're going to use through how the concentration change affects the rate.

Kyra LeRoy 1E
Posts: 52
Joined: Sat Jul 22, 2017 3:00 am

Re: Finding n

Postby Kyra LeRoy 1E » Sun Mar 11, 2018 12:18 am

When using experimental data, answers will not always be exact. However, they should be close enough to where you can assume 1.9 or 2.1 is 2, but not assuming the answer is 2 if you have, for example, 2.5.

AnuPanneerselvam1H
Posts: 52
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:07 am

Re: Finding n

Postby AnuPanneerselvam1H » Sun Mar 11, 2018 11:24 pm

My TA mentioned that for problems in this class, n will always be close to a whole number.

Annalyn Diaz 1J
Posts: 61
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:15 am

Re: Finding n

Postby Annalyn Diaz 1J » Sat Mar 02, 2019 1:00 pm

Michelle Lee 2E wrote:What if the n value we calculate using the method of initial rates was not a whole number but some weird decimal?


Dr. Lavelle also said in lecture that he wouldn't give us any fractional orders or anything that you couldn't round to a whole number.


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