K limiting rate


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Frenz Cabison 1B
Posts: 54
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:07 am

K limiting rate

Postby Frenz Cabison 1B » Sun Mar 04, 2018 9:18 pm

How does K limit the rate of a reaction?

Rachel Brown 3A
Posts: 52
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:06 am

Re: K limiting rate

Postby Rachel Brown 3A » Sun Mar 04, 2018 9:42 pm

Because it's the rate constant so a large value of K will make the reaction faster where a lower K will cause a slower reaction

AnuPanneerselvam1H
Posts: 52
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:07 am

Re: K limiting rate

Postby AnuPanneerselvam1H » Sun Mar 04, 2018 9:45 pm

Each reaction has a unique rate. A higher k means a faster reaction and a lower k means a slower reaction. When you multiply k times the concentrations in the rate law, you get the unique reaction rate for the specific reaction.

Gurkriti Ahluwalia 1K
Posts: 37
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:07 am

Re: K limiting rate

Postby Gurkriti Ahluwalia 1K » Mon Mar 05, 2018 5:30 pm

how are the units for k the same as the rate for a zero order reaction?
if rate =k[A]^0 then wouldn't you divide both sides by mol/L to get s^-1=k? i know this is the answer to the units for k for a first order reaction, but i'm assuming for a zero order reaction they are the same because of the 0 exponent which makes the whole term [A]^0=1.

clarifications??


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