Orders


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Timmy Nguyen Dis 1I
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Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:17 am

Orders

Postby Timmy Nguyen Dis 1I » Wed Mar 11, 2020 8:13 pm

How do we know which order the reaction is?

asannajust_1J
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Re: Orders

Postby asannajust_1J » Wed Mar 11, 2020 8:14 pm

the total order of the reaction is the sum of the exponential coefficients. This can be determined based on graphs, a given rate law, or an integrated rate law.

jisulee1C
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Re: Orders

Postby jisulee1C » Wed Mar 11, 2020 9:07 pm

the order can also be determined by the given rate constant and the units or from a table with given concentrations and rates

Brianna Becerra 1B
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Re: Orders

Postby Brianna Becerra 1B » Wed Mar 11, 2020 9:08 pm

A first-order reaction means that there is one reactant or molecule present in the rate law. A second-order rate law either has two of the same reactant (rate law would be squared) or two different ones (they would be multiplied by each other). Two examples of second-order reactions are rate=k[CO2]^2 or rate=k[CO2][H2O].

Mariah
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Re: Orders

Postby Mariah » Thu Mar 12, 2020 9:40 am

asannajust_1J wrote:the total order of the reaction is the sum of the exponential coefficients. This can be determined based on graphs, a given rate law, or an integrated rate law.


Would the graphs be given to us?

Michael Nguyen 1E
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Re: Orders

Postby Michael Nguyen 1E » Thu Mar 12, 2020 9:50 am

I believe that if we need to determine the order of a reaction based on graphs, then they will most likely provided the graphs that we need.

Noe BM 1J
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Re: Orders

Postby Noe BM 1J » Sun Mar 15, 2020 4:16 pm

How would we know the order of the reaction if we are given an integrated rate law?

asannajust_1J wrote:the total order of the reaction is the sum of the exponential coefficients. This can be determined based on graphs, a given rate law, or an integrated rate law.

Noe BM 1J
Posts: 50
Joined: Sat Sep 07, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Orders

Postby Noe BM 1J » Sun Mar 15, 2020 4:17 pm

As far as I know, we never include products in the rate law, correct?

Brianna Becerra 1B wrote:A first-order reaction means that there is one reactant or molecule present in the rate law. A second-order rate law either has two of the same reactant (rate law would be squared) or two different ones (they would be multiplied by each other). Two examples of second-order reactions are rate=k[CO2]^2 or rate=k[CO2][H2O].

Oduwole 1E
Posts: 100
Joined: Fri Aug 02, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Orders

Postby Oduwole 1E » Sun Mar 15, 2020 9:15 pm

Timmy Nguyen Dis 1I wrote:How do we know which order the reaction is?


You can use the given rate constant and the units or from a table with given concentrations and rates.


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