Changing Differential Rate Law to Integrated Rate Law


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Jessica Dang 1E
Posts: 11
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Changing Differential Rate Law to Integrated Rate Law

Postby Jessica Dang 1E » Fri Feb 05, 2016 3:41 pm

Rate =
and n = 1 because it's a first order reaction.

I had quick question as to what "1/a" represents because in the textbook the rate law for the consumption of A just says -1? (page 623 of textbook)

KVu 3G
Posts: 12
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Re: Changing Differential Rate Law to Integrated Rate Law

Postby KVu 3G » Sat Feb 06, 2016 10:34 pm

a refers to the coefficient in a general equation

The term -1/a defines how fast A is being consumed relative to the other reactants and products in the equation. For example B may not be consumed at the same rate A does, it's rate of consumption is dependent on b.


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