Negative Order RXN?


Moderators: Chem_Mod, Chem_Admin

Sophia Bozone 2G
Posts: 51
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:07 am

Negative Order RXN?

Postby Sophia Bozone 2G » Tue Mar 06, 2018 10:48 pm

What does it mean if a reaction has a negative order?

Morgan Baxter 1E
Posts: 50
Joined: Thu Jul 27, 2017 3:00 am

Re: Negative Order RXN?

Postby Morgan Baxter 1E » Tue Mar 06, 2018 11:15 pm

I'm not sure, but would it be if the concentration of the reactant doubled, but the rate halved? Would this be an example of a -1 order reaction?

Erik Khong 2E
Posts: 50
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:07 am

Re: Negative Order RXN?

Postby Erik Khong 2E » Wed Mar 07, 2018 12:32 am

If a species has a negative order, it means that the more concentration it has, the slower the reaction is.

An example given in the book is the decomposition of ozone, O3, in the upper atmosphere.
Its rate law is: Rate = k[O3]^2*[O2]^-1 or k[O3]^2/[O2]
This means that the reaction of decomposition is slower in areas where the atmosphere has more O2. (Greater denominator = smaller k)


Return to “First Order Reactions”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests