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First order graph

Posted: Tue Mar 05, 2019 2:51 pm
by Amy Lefley 1J
When graphing a first order reaction, with time on the x-axis and ln(A) on the y-axis, the y-intercept is the natural log of the initial concentration of the reactant, but what does the x-intercept of this graph represent?

Re: First order graph

Posted: Tue Mar 05, 2019 2:54 pm
by Gillian Murphy 2C
time

Re: First order graph

Posted: Tue Mar 05, 2019 3:34 pm
by Rachel-Weisz3C
It represents time and it is usually measured in seconds, therefore rate = M/s, but it can also be measured in minutes, hours... depending on the reaction.

Re: First order graph

Posted: Tue Mar 05, 2019 4:20 pm
by Heesu_Kim_1F
The x-intercept (meaning y=0) of the first order graph would represent the time (usually in seconds) when the concentration of the reactant reaches 0, or essentially when there is no more reactant concentration left.
Hope this helps!

Re: First order graph

Posted: Thu Mar 07, 2019 12:21 pm
by Megan_Ervin_1F
If ln(A) vs Time is a straight line, then the reaction is a first order reaction

Re: First order graph

Posted: Thu Mar 07, 2019 2:45 pm
by mbaker4E
The x axis is time, usually in seconds but it can also be in minutes, days, etc.

Re: First order graph

Posted: Thu Mar 07, 2019 3:44 pm
by varunhariharan
The x-intercept shows how much time time (t) it takes for the natural log of [A] to equal zero, and for [A] to equal zero.

Re: First order graph

Posted: Thu Mar 07, 2019 3:47 pm
by Nicole Lee 4E
The x-intercept would tell you the time at which all of your reactant A runs out.