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The symbol v?

Posted: Wed Oct 17, 2018 11:14 pm
by Daniel Chang 3I
Why is the same symbol used for velocity and frequency? Is there a correlation/connection between them?

Re: The symbol v?

Posted: Wed Oct 17, 2018 11:16 pm
by Ethan Yi 1K
its actually not the same symbol. velocity is the actual letter 'v' but frequency is the Greek letter nu. It's like a curvy v.

Re: The symbol v?

Posted: Thu Oct 18, 2018 1:39 pm
by Millicent Navarro 1I
Just to reiterate the comment above, there is a difference between the symbols of frequency and velocity. Furthermore, frequency is represented by the Greek letter nu (similar to v but has a curly/curvy edge to it) and velocity is represented by a lowercase v.

Re: The symbol v?

Posted: Thu Oct 18, 2018 8:39 pm
by Linh Vo 2J
Hello! I was confused on this earlier too, but my UA clarified in my session that for this class, when you see v in terms of velocity, it will most likely be paired up with m (mass) in an equation or formula. Velocity is seen in the equations 1/2mv^2 and p=mv. While with the curly v, that would be considered frequency and is seen in c=(wavelength)v and E=hv.

Re: The symbol v?

Posted: Thu Oct 18, 2018 11:53 pm
by Xinyi Zeng 4C
They do look similar when you are writing them in the answer! What I do to differentiate them is that, I will put what it represents right in front or next to it whenever I am using it or finding its value, like velocity, v=... or frequency, (curvy v)=...
Usually they will not appear in the same question, but it they do, just write down what it represents to avoid confusion.

Re: The symbol v?

Posted: Sun Oct 21, 2018 4:36 pm
by Joussie Camacho 4I
Hi! Will we be marked down if our nu looks like a v in the E=h v equation? Because on the homework I just used v and if I'm rushing on the test, it'll probably be hard to distinguish my v from my nu. Also, nu represents frequency but in other light equations it showed up as v, so are they interchangeable at all in certain instances?

Re: The symbol v?

Posted: Sun Oct 21, 2018 4:37 pm
by Joussie Camacho 4I
Hi! Will we be marked down if our nu looks like a v in the E=h v equation? Because on the homework I just used v and if I'm rushing on the test, it'll probably be hard to distinguish my v from my nu. Also, nu represents frequency but in other light equations it showed up as v, so are they interchangeable at all in certain instances?

Re: The symbol v?

Posted: Sun Oct 21, 2018 4:43 pm
by Rachel-Weisz3C
I don't think they are ever interchangeable since v (nu) in E=hv for instance stands for frequency, but v represents velocity in an equation like KE=1/2mv^2. They are two different things and can't be looked at as interchangeable.

Re: The symbol v?

Posted: Sun Oct 21, 2018 4:44 pm
by AJ Manzano 3K
Frequency is a curvy v (usually it’ll be italicized in print)
Velocity is a normal print v (warning: if you capitalize this one then it’ll mean volume)

Re: The symbol v?

Posted: Sun Oct 21, 2018 4:48 pm
by Brice McKeown 3D
In response to Josie, I think on a test, TAs aren't looking to mark you down because your nu looks like "v." I'd say just try your best to make it curvy.

Re: The symbol v?

Posted: Sun Oct 21, 2018 5:29 pm
by Heidi Ibarra Castillo 1D
Yeah exactly, frequency is usually italicized with a curve to it where as velocity is just a regular lower case v. It might be confusing at first to depict it from the equations, but they do have different appearances.

Re: The symbol v?

Posted: Sun Oct 21, 2018 7:51 pm
by Lauren Solouki 4E
If you ever get confused about which v the question is referring to, just remember velocity v pretty much always has an m next to it (mass)

Re: The symbol v?

Posted: Sun Oct 21, 2018 11:20 pm
by Connie Chen 3D
As everyone has said before. The letter v represents velocity while the curvy v represents frequency. The two are almost never in the same equation, and if you are doubtful about which one you are to use, try to cancel out the units to see if they match what you need to find. Velocity is almost always m/s while frequency is always in Hz (1/s).

Re: The symbol v?

Posted: Mon Oct 22, 2018 12:33 am
by daniela3D
In the lecture about "Wave Properties of Light" frequency and velocity are technically the same. However, their symbols differ from each other: frequency (s^-1)= velocity (m.s^-1)

Re: The symbol v?

Posted: Mon Oct 22, 2018 12:33 am
by daniela3D
In the lecture about "Wave Properties of Light" frequency and velocity are technically the same. However, their symbols differ from each other: frequency (s^-1)= velocity (m.s^-1)

Re: The symbol v?

Posted: Mon Oct 22, 2018 3:16 pm
by Chem_Mod
Familiarize yourself with the equation sheet and how they denote velocity versus frequency. As long as you substitute the correct values into your equations, you will get credit. You are not graded on your ability to draw "v's," but do try to make them look different.

Re: The symbol v?

Posted: Mon Oct 22, 2018 5:36 pm
by Aleeque Marselian 1A
Although they look similar, the symbols used for velocity and frequency are not the same. The symbol for frequency is the Greek letter nu, while velocity is denoted the the lowercase letter v.