E=hv


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Chase Yonamine 1J
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E=hv

Postby Chase Yonamine 1J » Thu Oct 25, 2018 1:20 pm

In the equation, E=hv, does E represent the energy of the photon or does it represent the energy required to remove an electron?

anthony_trieu2L
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Joined: Thu Sep 27, 2018 11:29 pm

Re: E=hv

Postby anthony_trieu2L » Thu Oct 25, 2018 1:24 pm

The value E represents the energy of the photon. However, you can use the equation E=hv to calculate the energy required to remove an electron after taking into account the kinetic energy. This works because the energy of the photon must be greater than or equal to the energy required to remove the electron.

Stevin1H
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Re: E=hv

Postby Stevin1H » Thu Oct 25, 2018 1:45 pm

E=hv represents the energy of the photon. However, it could also be equal to the energy required to remove an electron if the kinetic energy is 0. This is shown in the formula E(photon) - work function = Kinetic energy. If the Kinetic energy is 0, then the energy of the photon is equal to the work function.

haleyervin7
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Re: E=hv

Postby haleyervin7 » Thu Oct 25, 2018 5:06 pm

When it says we should be able to calculate the number of photons from this equation, we must have the total energy before we can do that, right?

sarahartzell1k
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Re: E=hv

Postby sarahartzell1k » Thu Oct 25, 2018 5:27 pm

E represents the energy of the photon but you can also use this equation to find the energy needed to remove the electron, just remember to pay attention to kinetic energy.

Jocelyne Milke 1G
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Re: E=hv

Postby Jocelyne Milke 1G » Fri Oct 26, 2018 4:15 pm

The work function is the energy needed to remove an electron.

Anmol_cheema_2F
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Re: E=hv

Postby Anmol_cheema_2F » Fri Oct 26, 2018 10:56 pm

E represents the energy of the photon, while the work function is the minimum energy needed to remove an electron.

KHuang1L
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Re: E=hv

Postby KHuang1L » Sat Oct 27, 2018 9:54 am

E is the energy of the photon. That equation is used to find the energy of a photon of light going at a certain speed. H is Planck's constant and v is the frequency of the electron. If E is equal to or greater than the threshold energy required to release an electron from an atom, then the electron is released.

Dayna Pham 1I
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Re: E=hv

Postby Dayna Pham 1I » Sat Oct 27, 2018 11:47 am

E in this case is E(photon). The work function is the energy required to eject an electron in a 1:1 photon:electron interaction.

Keshav Bhatnagar 1H
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Re: E=hv

Postby Keshav Bhatnagar 1H » Sat Oct 27, 2018 5:56 pm

The E in E = hv represents the energy of a photon. The E in Ek = 1/2(mv^2) represents the excess energy after an electron is removed from a metal.

105085381
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Re: E=hv

Postby 105085381 » Mon Oct 29, 2018 12:10 pm

I understand that...
Keshav Bhatnagar wrote:The E in E = hv represents the energy of a photon. The E in Ek = 1/2(mv^2) represents the excess energy after an electron is removed from a metal.

...but, can someone please clarify what the specific values are that we need to assign as hv and 1/2(mv^2)? Sorry if this was already stated!

Jayde Felix 4H
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Re: E=hv

Postby Jayde Felix 4H » Mon Oct 29, 2018 3:03 pm

Here, E would represent the energy of the photon

AlyssaBei_1F
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Re: E=hv

Postby AlyssaBei_1F » Mon Oct 29, 2018 3:28 pm

The E would represent the energy of the photon. The work function or threshold energy would be the energy required to remove an electron.

Cole Elsner 2J
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Re: E=hv

Postby Cole Elsner 2J » Mon Oct 29, 2018 4:09 pm

E represents the energy of the photon. h is Plancks's Constant (6.63*10^-34) and v is the calculated or measured frequency of a light source (typically UV or above for these equations)

Jack Hewitt 4G
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Re: E=hv

Postby Jack Hewitt 4G » Thu Dec 06, 2018 6:31 pm

Chase Yonamine 1K wrote:In the equation, E=hv, does E represent the energy of the photon or does it represent the energy required to remove an electron?

e represents the energy of a photon. The works function represents the energy required to remove an electron.


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