Variables in equations


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Jessica Tran_3K
Posts: 50
Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:17 am

Variables in equations

Postby Jessica Tran_3K » Fri Oct 11, 2019 7:49 pm

Hi guys,

I'm a little confused about some of the variables in the equations that we recently learned. How do you guys differentiate when the "V" in the equation denotes frequency versus velocity?

005388369
Posts: 73
Joined: Sat Sep 28, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Variables in equations

Postby 005388369 » Fri Oct 11, 2019 9:01 pm

I believe the "V" for frequency is actually the greek symbol "nu" so it looks a little different than the normal letter V.

Akshay Chellappa 1H
Posts: 59
Joined: Wed Sep 11, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Variables in equations

Postby Akshay Chellappa 1H » Fri Oct 11, 2019 9:06 pm

I think the easiest way to differentiate between nu and velocity would to just memorize all of the ways that one of the two can be applied in chemistry. So far, I think we've only seen velocity used to calculate momentum for De Broglie's Wave Equation. As we move through the quarter it might be a good idea to note down any other application of velocity to avoid confusion.

Ellen Amico 2L
Posts: 101
Joined: Thu Sep 19, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Variables in equations

Postby Ellen Amico 2L » Fri Oct 11, 2019 10:40 pm

The "v" for frequency isn't really a v but a greek letter, so I think of it more like a 'wavy' v and try to make it clear in my work. It's also helpful to know which equations use frequency and which use velocity off the top of your head.

McKenna_4A
Posts: 115
Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:18 am

Re: Variables in equations

Postby McKenna_4A » Fri Oct 11, 2019 10:43 pm

You'll just have to pay attention to the font, because frequency is the greek letter "nu."


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