kJ/mol


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305421980
Posts: 50
Joined: Sat Sep 07, 2019 12:16 am

kJ/mol

Postby 305421980 » Sun Oct 13, 2019 11:02 pm

I have a question regarding one of the post assessment questions (28b) from the atomic spectra module. In this problem, the units kJ/mol are used. In solving it, I just thought to use the kJ->J conversion but still ended up with the wrong answer. I'm not sure if I made just a calculation mistake or if I need to do something else to convert these units.

DMuth_1J
Posts: 63
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:15 am

Re: kJ/mol

Postby DMuth_1J » Mon Oct 14, 2019 2:41 pm

Are you making sure that your units are cohesive throughout the problem? For example, are you dividing KJ by J?

Rachel Yu 1I
Posts: 53
Joined: Fri Aug 09, 2019 12:15 am

Re: kJ/mol

Postby Rachel Yu 1I » Tue Oct 15, 2019 2:55 pm

The conversion is 1 kJ = 1000 J since kilo is 1000. If that's the conversion you used then you might have made a calculation error elsewhere.

505106414
Posts: 55
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:17 am

Re: kJ/mol

Postby 505106414 » Wed Oct 16, 2019 5:38 pm

305421980 wrote:I have a question regarding one of the post assessment questions (28b) from the atomic spectra module. In this problem, the units kJ/mol are used. In solving it, I just thought to use the kJ->J conversion but still ended up with the wrong answer. I'm not sure if I made just a calculation mistake or if I need to do something else to convert these units.


Should we always be converting kJ to J?

LBacker_4F
Posts: 54
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:21 am
Been upvoted: 1 time

Re: kJ/mol

Postby LBacker_4F » Thu Oct 17, 2019 11:35 pm

To the person who asked if you should always convert kJ to J, when you are using other values with units that involve J, yes you should 100% convert kJ to J. However, if it is your final answer, you would probably be fine leaving it either way.


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