Page 1 of 1

Intermediate

Posted: Thu Mar 08, 2018 12:05 am
by William Lan 2l
How do you determine the intermediate?

Re: Intermediate

Posted: Thu Mar 08, 2018 8:44 am
by Nina Gautam 1K
As Lavelle said in class, if there are intermediate steps, he will give us the intermediate species. We don't have enough general chemistry knowledge at this point to come up with it on our own.

Re: Intermediate

Posted: Thu Mar 08, 2018 9:17 am
by Elizabeth Bamishaye 2I
Intermediates are the species that are not in overall reaction. You could find them by viewing a species that is produced then it is consumed.

Re: Intermediate

Posted: Thu Mar 08, 2018 6:58 pm
by Ya Gao
Intermediate can be determined by looking at the separate steps of a reaction. If one molecule is produced in one step and consumed in the following step, then the molecule can be considered an intermediate.

Re: Intermediate

Posted: Thu Mar 08, 2018 7:17 pm
by Swetha Sundaram 1E
Right so when you compare them in separate reactions, we essentially cancel them out which is why they are not shown in the final reaction equation.

Re: Intermediate

Posted: Thu Mar 08, 2018 7:47 pm
by Sohini Halder 1G
Intermediates are FORMED and then CONSUMED within the steps of elementary reactions.
Catalysts are present from the beginning and are not consumed in the reaction; this is why only a little bit of catalyst is needed to increase the rate of a specific reaction.

Re: Intermediate

Posted: Thu Mar 08, 2018 8:03 pm
by Ashley Macabasco 2K
Intermediates are formed in one step and the consumed in the next, so the intermediate will be the species that is present in the steps but not present in the final equation.

Re: Intermediate  [ENDORSED]

Posted: Sat Mar 10, 2018 5:50 pm
by Garret G 2F
Sohini Halder 1G wrote:Intermediates are FORMED and then CONSUMED within the steps of elementary reactions.
Catalysts are present from the beginning and are not consumed in the reaction; this is why only a little bit of catalyst is needed to increase the rate of a specific reaction.


Here is a video that explains this in a little more detail: https://youtu.be/UkoImD80-BM