Variable for frequency

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Tyra Nguyen 4H
Posts: 74
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:25 am

Variable for frequency

Postby Tyra Nguyen 4H » Fri Oct 12, 2018 1:11 pm

Is there another variable that is used to represent frequency? It can be confusing when E=hv and Ek=(1/2)meve2 and the v is also velocity.

DavidEcheverri3J
Posts: 36
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:26 am

Re: Variable for frequency

Postby DavidEcheverri3J » Fri Oct 12, 2018 1:17 pm

I guess you could replace nu (the greek letter that stands for frequency and looks like a V) with Hz so that it could be easier to differentiate in your own work, but I would make sure to be careful because the question will most likely give you the frequency with a V instead of Hertz.

505211599
Posts: 60
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:28 am

Re: Variable for frequency

Postby 505211599 » Fri Oct 12, 2018 1:19 pm

To my knowledge, there aren’t any other variable you could use to differentiate frequency and velocity. You could just curve the v to differentiate it from a normal V.

sameeksha_panda_3h
Posts: 31
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:25 am

Re: Variable for frequency

Postby sameeksha_panda_3h » Fri Oct 12, 2018 2:21 pm

No, to my knowledge there isn't another variable to use, but the v for velocity and v for frequency are normally written differently (i.e the v for frequency is usually curvy-ish). However, if you want to replace v with another variable you can either write in nu as recommended before or make your own key to use! (Just make sure to make it clear on tests/ homework probably and don't use variables used elsewhere either.)

Megan Wong 4E
Posts: 32
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:28 am

Re: Variable for frequency

Postby Megan Wong 4E » Fri Oct 12, 2018 3:24 pm

Just to clarify further, v is for velocity while nu is for frequency.

Joonsoo Kim 4L
Posts: 61
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:29 am

Re: Variable for frequency

Postby Joonsoo Kim 4L » Fri Oct 12, 2018 4:46 pm

My high school teacher used lowercase "f" to represent frequency, which was pretty useful in the context of high school chemistry, and which wasn't ever confused with v or even capital F for force. I'm not sure if a new variable "f" will be introduced later on, but this has worked for me.

Ivan Tadeja 4B
Posts: 31
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:28 am

Re: Variable for frequency

Postby Ivan Tadeja 4B » Fri Oct 12, 2018 6:00 pm

The variables representing different values can be manipulated to your benefit, if you were to chose any other variable that you would know for a fact you would be able to distinguish, I don't see a reason why you shouldn't. The answer won't be any different as long as the true representations of these variables remain universal.


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