Maximum possible energy of emitted electrons

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Madison Gil 3D
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:23 am

Maximum possible energy of emitted electrons

Postby Madison Gil 3D » Sun Oct 14, 2018 5:56 pm

Molybdenum metal must absorb radiation with a minimum frequency of 1.09 x 1015 s-1 before it can emit an electron from its surface.
The minimum energy needed for this is 7.22 x 10^-19.
If molybdenum is irradiated with 194 nm light, what is the maximum possible kinetic energy of the emitted electrons?
How would you solve this problem?

Chem_Mod
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Re: Maximum possible energy of emitted electrons

Postby Chem_Mod » Sun Oct 14, 2018 6:29 pm

The energy of the incident light must equal to the energy required to remove an electron + the kinetic energy of the electron, or else energy would be lost to the system. You know how frequency relates to energy of the photon, this will give you initial energy. The energy required to remove one electron from the surface of a metal is called the work function. Knowing these two energies, you can calculate the kinetic energy of the removed electron.


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