intensity

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davidryan3f
Posts: 63
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:23 am

intensity

Postby davidryan3f » Sun Nov 04, 2018 3:22 pm

how does increasing the intensity of the incoming photon affect the energy of the photon. Does it increase its energy, and if so, does that increase the number of electrons that will be emitted?

Aurbal Popal
Posts: 63
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:27 am

Re: intensity

Postby Aurbal Popal » Sun Nov 04, 2018 3:36 pm

Intensity does not affect the energy of the photon. However, it does change the amount of photons present.
That is why light with long wavelength (and low frequencies) cannot eject an electron even in high intensities; there may be more photons, but these photons do no individually have enough energy to emit an electron. Only a light with a short enough wavelength (and high frequency) can do that. If you were to increase the intensity of the light in this situation, then I believe more electrons would be emitted as there are more photons available that have sufficient energy to do so.

Hope this helps.

Casandra
Posts: 65
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:17 am

Re: intensity

Postby Casandra » Sun Nov 04, 2018 3:38 pm

davidryan3f wrote:how does increasing the intensity of the incoming photon affect the energy of the photon. Does it increase its energy, and if so, does that increase the number of electrons that will be emitted?


Increasing the intensity increases the number of photons, because intensity and the number of photons are proportional. This however, does not mean that the photons will have enough energy to emit electrons: intensity does not affect energy.

chris_tsai_4H
Posts: 52
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:26 am

Re: intensity

Postby chris_tsai_4H » Sun Nov 04, 2018 3:56 pm

Intensity does not affect the energy of the ejected electron. The intensity will only affect the amount of electrons ejected

JiangJC Dis2K
Posts: 72
Joined: Fri Oct 12, 2018 12:16 am

Re: intensity

Postby JiangJC Dis2K » Sun Nov 04, 2018 5:00 pm

Intensity relates to the quantity of photons. Basically, if the intensity decreases then there are less photons in the stream of light. Since photons are essentially packets of energy, this means that there is less energy going in-leading to either insufficient amount to eject electrons or less electrons ejected.


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