Energy to remove an electron

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HimaniMadnawat3L
Posts: 15
Joined: Fri Sep 26, 2014 2:02 pm

Energy to remove an electron

Postby HimaniMadnawat3L » Wed Oct 08, 2014 10:11 pm

In lecture it was briefly discussed that an electron will not be emitted if the energy of a photon is greater than or equal to the energy o needed to remove an electron from the surface of a metal. I was wondering why this is so. Is there not supposed to be any excess energy?

RuniTanna4H
Posts: 11
Joined: Fri Sep 26, 2014 2:02 pm

Re: Energy to remove an electron

Postby RuniTanna4H » Wed Oct 08, 2014 10:24 pm

The electron will be emitted, as long as the energy of the photon is greater than or equal to the energy required to remove the electron. If the energy is greater than what is required, that will be the excess energy. The equation in the course reader (pg. 5, ch. 1) states that unless these conditions are met, no electrons will be emitted, no matter what intensity the light is.

Jeff Kohl 1D
Posts: 7
Joined: Fri Sep 26, 2014 2:02 pm

Re: Energy to remove an electron

Postby Jeff Kohl 1D » Sun Oct 12, 2014 3:13 pm

If the work function requirement is met and an electron is ejected, any excess energy appears in the kinetic energy of the ejected electron. The more excess energy that is present, the higher velocity the ejected electron will have.

Justin Le 2I
Posts: 142
Joined: Fri Sep 26, 2014 2:02 pm

Re: Energy to remove an electron

Postby Justin Le 2I » Wed Oct 15, 2014 2:10 am

If there is no excess energy, then the electron is removed but it doesn't go anywhere and has no kinetic energy. Thus, the threshold energy and and the energy brought by the photon are equal.


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