Energy of Photon Clarification

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Ariel Fern 2B
Posts: 105
Joined: Fri Aug 30, 2019 12:17 am

Energy of Photon Clarification

Postby Ariel Fern 2B » Sat Oct 12, 2019 8:46 pm

In the lecture notes, it states that:
"(E = hv) - Work Function = (Ek = 1/2 mv^2),
UNLESS... E(photon) > E(Energy Remove e-)
then e- not emitted even for high intensity light
If light had only wave properties, then increasing intensity should eject e-"

This E(photon) is referring to a light wave with a long wavelength, right? I'm just confused because I know that a light wave with a short wavelength proportionally ejects more electrons if it has more intensity/photons. Shouldn't E(Photon) always be greater than or equal to the work function in order to eject an electron? Just want to make sure the lecture notes are referring to what I think it is referring to! Thanks!

FDeCastro_1B
Posts: 54
Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Energy of Photon Clarification

Postby FDeCastro_1B » Sat Oct 12, 2019 9:20 pm

Yes! E(photon) should always be greater than or equal to the work function in order to eject an electron.

Ariel Fern 2B
Posts: 105
Joined: Fri Aug 30, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Energy of Photon Clarification

Postby Ariel Fern 2B » Sun Oct 13, 2019 6:09 pm

FDeCastro_1B wrote:Yes! E(photon) should always be greater than or equal to the work function in order to eject an electron.


Thank you so much! This gives me peace of mind that I didn't copy down the notes wrong or misunderstand the lecture, haha!

Nyari Muchaka_Discussion 4A
Posts: 53
Joined: Thu Sep 19, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Energy of Photon Clarification

Postby Nyari Muchaka_Discussion 4A » Sun Oct 13, 2019 6:37 pm

Since the electrons require a specific threshold of energy in order to be ejected, the energy or photon hitting the electron has to be greater than or at least equal to the amount of work needed to eject it.

Tahlia Mullins
Posts: 105
Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Energy of Photon Clarification

Postby Tahlia Mullins » Sun Oct 13, 2019 7:36 pm

A good way for me to remember it is that the energy of the photon has to be equal to the or greater than the energy required, calculated by the work function, to emit the electron.


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