Photoelectric Effect

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JTieu_2I
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Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:34 pm

Photoelectric Effect

Postby JTieu_2I » Tue Oct 27, 2020 5:45 pm

Even if the energy of the photon is less than the work function does the energy still get absorbed, regardless if it does not eject an electron? (in photoelectric effect)

Quentin Scarborough 1A
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Re: Photoelectric Effect

Postby Quentin Scarborough 1A » Tue Oct 27, 2020 5:49 pm

Im pretty sure Prof Lavelle said that if the energy of the photon is less than the work function that it just passes through and is not absorbed.

Jenny Lee 3A
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Re: Photoelectric Effect

Postby Jenny Lee 3A » Tue Oct 27, 2020 6:02 pm

I actually thought that if this happened for the photoelectric effect, the electron was excited but not removed. I thought that the part about not being able to absorb the light and the light passing through was for the atomic spectra.

Someone might have to check up on this though!

Faith St Amant 1E
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Re: Photoelectric Effect

Postby Faith St Amant 1E » Tue Oct 27, 2020 6:14 pm

I'm pretty sure that just in general atoms won't absorb EM radiation unless it has an energy that is equal to the energy difference between the different energy levels (n). So if the radiation has the right wavelength to match the sprectra of the metal it is being directed at, it will be absorbed and electrons will be excited, but an electron will only be fully ejected if the radiation has an energy greater than the work function. Hope that makes sense!

Aaina 1D
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Re: Photoelectric Effect

Postby Aaina 1D » Tue Oct 27, 2020 6:34 pm

The energy does not get absorbed if it's less than the work function - it just passes through the metal

Kimiya Aframian IB
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Re: Photoelectric Effect

Postby Kimiya Aframian IB » Tue Oct 27, 2020 8:13 pm

JTieu_2I wrote:Even if the energy of the photon is less than the work function does the energy still get absorbed, regardless if it does not eject an electron? (in photoelectric effect)

Hi! I think that if the energy of the photon does not "match" the work function then it will just not be absorbed and will pass through.

Katie Le 2K
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Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:35 pm

Re: Photoelectric Effect

Postby Katie Le 2K » Tue Oct 27, 2020 11:04 pm

If the energy of a photon doesn't "match with" (less than) the work function, it just passes through the metal.

Eileen Quach Discussion 2J
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Re: Photoelectric Effect

Postby Eileen Quach Discussion 2J » Wed Oct 28, 2020 12:05 am

I believe it still gets absorbed, and the electrons in the metal are excited, but they're just not removed.

Yuelai Feng 3E
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Re: Photoelectric Effect

Postby Yuelai Feng 3E » Wed Oct 28, 2020 12:34 am

Hi! If the energy of light matches the energy difference between two electron shells, then the energy will be absorbed and it will excite the electron to a higher energy level. This is the same situation as in atomic absorption spectrum. However, if the energy does not match then it will not be absorbed. Hope it helps!

Kiara Phillips 1L
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Re: Photoelectric Effect

Postby Kiara Phillips 1L » Sun Nov 01, 2020 10:30 am

No, unfortunately there is not any fun chemistry there it just passes through the material.

Vanshika Bhushan 3A
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Re: Photoelectric Effect

Postby Vanshika Bhushan 3A » Sun Nov 01, 2020 3:51 pm

If a photon has an energy at least as big as the work function, the photon energy can be transferred to the electron and the electron will have enough energy to escape from the metal. But a photon with an energy less than the work function will never be able to eject electrons.

Jonathan Malau 2I
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Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:31 pm

Re: Photoelectric Effect

Postby Jonathan Malau 2I » Sun Nov 01, 2020 4:13 pm

If the energy of a photon is less than the work function, then it may not get absorbed. A photon with less energy than work function is unable to eject electrons.

Anthony_Sandoval_1D
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Joined: Wed Feb 19, 2020 12:15 am

Re: Photoelectric Effect

Postby Anthony_Sandoval_1D » Sun Nov 01, 2020 11:41 pm

A photon with less energy than the work function will not be able to eject electrons. This is only possible when the photon has at least as much energy as the work function.


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