1.11 Different Series

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kara_kremer_2N
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Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2016 3:00 am

1.11 Different Series

Postby kara_kremer_2N » Thu Sep 29, 2016 2:50 pm

Question 1.11 states, "In the spectrum of atomic hydrogen, several lines are generally classified together as belonging to a series (for example, Balmer series, Lyman series, Paschen series), as shown in Figs. 1.10 and 2.1. What is common to the lines within a series that makes groupie them together logical?"

I've read both the solutions manual answer and the sections in the textbook on this topic, but I'm still unable to fully grasp this. Can someone please expand on it?

Chem_Mod
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Re: 1.11 Different Series

Postby Chem_Mod » Sat Oct 01, 2016 7:54 pm

All that a series denotes is that the energy level that the electron transitions to are the same for each respective series.

Alyssa_Hsu_2K
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Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 3:00 pm

Re: 1.11 Different Series

Postby Alyssa_Hsu_2K » Sun Oct 02, 2016 12:07 pm

So for instance, a Lyman series always transitions to n=1, the Balmer series n=2, and the Paschen series n=3? Is this also why each series usually produce electromagnetic radiation and different points of the spectrum? (Visible light, ultraviolet...etc)?

AnnaTong1E
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Re: 1.11 Different Series

Postby AnnaTong1E » Tue Oct 04, 2016 11:44 am

When you say a Lyman series always transitions to n=1, do you mean that this is where the electrons come to rest (at energy level=1?)

Just a little confused on this part & hoping some clarification will help! Thanks


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