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Rydberg Equation

Posted: Sat Oct 08, 2016 3:40 pm
by Niveda_Tennety_1H
Is it usually more efficient to use the Rydberg equation in these types of problems where frequency and an initial/final energy level are provided? In other words, when would you use E=-hR/n^2 over the Rydberg Equation?

Re: Rydberg Equation  [ENDORSED]

Posted: Sat Oct 08, 2016 8:22 pm
by Derek Lee 2K
My TA said to always use it because they give partial credit if we at least find the energy of each n level. He said that if we use ryberg's, if we mess up the calculation in any way and get the wrong answer, then the whole thing is wrong and there's no partial credit.

Re: Rydberg Equation

Posted: Thu Oct 13, 2016 12:17 am
by Meera McAdam 1C
In regards to the partial credit vs. no credit,
I was doing a problem where I first wrote down E=-hR/n^2, then needed to find frequency v, so using Einstein's equation E=hv, I divided everything by h. I then put it into the form of Ef - Ei = change in Energy.
Essentially, I derived the Rydberg's formula (v=R{1/n1^2 - 1/n2^2}) from the original hydrogen emission equation.

Since it's more efficient to plug everything into this equation, and I showed that I derived it, does that change anything in terms of grading?
Also, is Rydberg's formula still only limited to Hydrogen, like E=-hR/n^2?

Re: Rydberg Equation

Posted: Thu Oct 13, 2016 9:16 pm
by Xiaoman_Kang_2J
Meera McAdam 3F wrote:In regards to the partial credit vs. no credit,
I was doing a problem where I first wrote down E=-hR/n^2, then needed to find frequency v, so using Einstein's equation E=hv, I divided everything by h. I then put it into the form of Ef - Ei = change in Energy.
Essentially, I derived the Rydberg's formula (v=R{1/n1^2 - 1/n2^2}) from the original hydrogen emission equation.

Since it's more efficient to plug everything into this equation, and I showed that I derived it, does that change anything in terms of grading?
Also, is Rydberg's formula still only limited to Hydrogen, like E=-hR/n^2?


If you show the process of deriving it, you should be fine. And, yes, Rydberg's formula is still only limited to hydrogen.

Re: Rydberg Equation

Posted: Fri Oct 14, 2016 1:27 am
by Justin Folk 3I
Will we be given that it is a hydrogen atom? This only works for hydrogen, but the problem 8 in the practice quiz 2 didn't list it as a hydrogen atom.