Question about 1.17  [ENDORSED]

H-Atom ()

Moderators: Chem_Mod, Chem_Admin

304922790
Posts: 25
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:04 am

Question about 1.17

Postby 304922790 » Fri Oct 13, 2017 10:26 pm

During the lecture, Lavelle showed us (En=-hR/(n^2), the other form of the Rydberg equation. Can I use this equation instead of the Z-indpendent Rydberg equation to solve this problem?

The problem is:
The energy levels of hydrogenlike one-electron ions of atomic number Z differ from those of hydrogen by a factor of Z^2. Predict the wavelength of the transition from n=2 to n=1 in He+ .

Chem_Mod
Posts: 18400
Joined: Thu Aug 04, 2011 1:53 pm
Has upvoted: 435 times

Re: Question about 1.17  [ENDORSED]

Postby Chem_Mod » Sat Oct 14, 2017 8:26 pm

Yes, you can. In this case, since it’s helium we’re looking at, we have to take into account Z=2. The equation is En = -(Z2)(h*R/n2). You can then find the change in energy by subtracting Efinal and Einitial to get the energy of the light. From there, use the E = (h*c)/lambda equation to find lambda.

veneziaramirez 3I
Posts: 57
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:07 am

Re: Question about 1.17

Postby veneziaramirez 3I » Mon Oct 16, 2017 10:46 pm

Even though it is He^+ we would still make Z 2? So if it is a one-electron ion, we would use how many the element originally has?

Chem_Mod
Posts: 18400
Joined: Thu Aug 04, 2011 1:53 pm
Has upvoted: 435 times

Re: Question about 1.17

Postby Chem_Mod » Mon Oct 16, 2017 11:08 pm

Z by definition is atomic number. Since atomic number determines the element, we would still use Z=2, even though it lost an electron.


Return to “Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest